New Gravity Pictures And Posters Emphasize The Desolation Of Space

By Brent McKnight | 7 years ago

Gravity PosterAlfonso Cuaron’s Gravity is one of the most anticipated films, science fiction or otherwise, of the fall season. By now we’ve all seen those dizzying, harrowing trailers full of his trademark long takes and sweeping camera moves. If the idea of floating off, alone, into space doesn’t scare the living hell out of you, then you’re much braver than most of us. The Children of Men director’s latest doesn’t arrive in theaters until October 4, but those lucky enough to be at the Toronto International Film Festival in September will get to see Gravity before the rest of the world. For you and me, we will have to content ourselves with gawking at this new gallery of photos from the film, and two new posters.

These images really drive home the point that space is lonely as hell, and that one wrong move, even a minor one, can have disastrous consequences. These seem to be two of the bigger overall themes of the film: isolation and precarious positioning. From what we know there are really only two primary characters—there are likely some more on the ground, but the important people are floating around outside of our atmosphere.

Gravity tells the story of a brilliant medical engineer, Dr. Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock), on her first mission to outer space. Being a rookie, she is teamed up with a veteran of numerous space jaunts, Matt Kowalsky (George Clooney). This is to be his final mission before retirement. Having seen a movie or two in our days, we know that the “one last job,” no matter the actual task, never goes as smoothly as is originally intended. What’s the worst thing that can happen when you’re in space? Your shuttle craps out, right? Well, when Stone and Kowalsky step out for what they think is a routine spacewalk, everything goes to hell, and their craft is destroyed. The two are left out there alone, tethered only to each other, floating into the empty blackness. Sucks to be them. You can definitely see the terror on Bullock’s face, through the front shield of her helmet.

In most circumstances I’m not a big proponent of 3D, but in the case of Gravity, I’m willing to make an exception. What we’ve seen of Cuaron’s camera work, with shots zooming and panning through space, you can tell he’s going to make full use of the technology available to him. To be honest, I’m pretty susceptible to motion sickness, and I’m a little worried that this might be too much for me. But I’m willing to risk a little nausea for Gravity.

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