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The Walking Dead Might Get Banned In China Next Year Because Of This

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the walking deadI’m not sure how many of our readers, if any, are Chinese citizens, but there’s a good chance they won’t be catching up one of the most popular series on television, The Walking Dead, five months from now. And The Walking Dead is only the tip of the gore-soaked iceberg, as the Chinese government is cracking down on online streaming sites, both legal and illegal.

Last month, TV viewers all over the country were shocked and disappointed to find that Chinese authorities shut down two of the nation’s most used file-sharing sites, meaning access to hundreds of U.S. TV episodes (along with their Chinese subtitles) were completely vanquished. Moving forward, the government has made it clear that, starting in April, they’re tasking broadcast regulators with only approving less mature content to go through their legal streaming sites, such as Sohu, a site where over 103 million views have been tabulated for Netflix’s flagship political drama House of Cards. That show, with its sex-for-power plot points and negative talk about China’s communism, will definitely be on the cutting block. It seems like even the words “cutting block” will be removed.

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Chinese Spacecraft Returns Safely After A Trip Around The Moon, Details Here

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China-Lunar-Sample-ProgramAfter the week the space travel industry had, we all need a happy space story right about now. This one happens to involve a private spacecraft, but not one built or launched in America. On Saturday, the first privately funded moon mission concluded a successful eight-day return trip.

The mission, called 4M (Manfred Memorial Moon Mission), was developed by LuxSpace, a company from Luxembourg, and coupled with a Chinese lunar flyby mission called Chang’e 5-T1 (you might recognize the name Chang’e from the Yutu mission). The flyby was developed to test China’s new re-entry technology, as the country is ramping up its lunar exploration program, while the 4M project was an experiment in communications and the feasibility of crowdsourcing participation.

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Film Critics In China Are Not Fans Of Guardians Of The Galaxy, Here’s Why

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GuardiansIt’s no great secret that we totally love Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy around these parts, it may very well turn out to be the best time we had at the movies all year long. Judging by the fact that it just topped the $700 million mark at the global box office, as well as being the top domestic earner of the year so far, there are many of you out there who agree. But not everyone feels the same way, and one group in particular happens to be Chinese film critics.

Marvel’s latest blockbuster recently opened in China and is receiving middling reviews from moviegoers as well as members of the press. If you’re asking yourself how anyone can hate the sarcastic adventures of the mismatched team of space outlaws comprised of Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax the Destroyer, Rocket Raccoon and Groot, the answer seems to be because of truly terrible subtitles, according to China Daily.

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Researchers Create Fake Social Network To Figure Out Chinese Censorship

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Internet-Censorship-in-ChinaFor those of us who spend ridiculous amounts of time on the internet, it’s hard to imagine what it would be like to live in a society in which our online use was censored. I mean, all that widely available and freely posted content certainly isn’t being manipulated in any way, and there’s no censorship of content here, right? And no one believes ISPs and governments should be able to discriminate or charge certain users more… Okay, so I’m feeling a little sarcastic when it comes to Big Brother, the NSA, and net neutrality, but I have to admit that, compared to some other countries, we still have it pretty good here. According to Reporters Without borders, countries such as China, Iran, North Korea, and Syria all practice “pervasive” censorship and filter information online for political and social reasons, and even sometimes black out the news completely. Recently, Harvard and University of California San Diego researchers tried to figure out how China’s system of censorship works, and in order to figure it out, they created a fake social network.

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Godzilla Is The Box Office King In China

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godzillaTasks don’t get more impossible than trying to stop a 350-foot monster from taking over the world, and Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla has done a fine job of proving that when it comes to raking in the moolah at the box office. In the ever expanding, Hollywood-loving market of China, Godzilla opened to a robust $36 million weekend, marking the largest ever Chinese debut of a Warner Bros. film. We assume that’s only because Veronica Mars didn’t open there, as everyone knows China loves snarky blonde detectives, right?

This is yet another big boost for America’s latest creature feature, as China raised Godzilla‘s global box office total to over $440 million, with less than half of that, $191 million, coming from U.S. ticket sales. Though China’s was the only opening, the blockbuster still took in over $38 million this weekend from 63 international markets. Even though the production budget was estimated at $160 million, with untold millions thrown into that massive marketing campaign, it’s safe to call Godzilla a profitable motion picture.

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Chinese Drones Spy On Polluters

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China dronesIt’s no secret that I’m concerned about the increasing use of drones (except those that deliver beer) for military and/or surveillance purposes. It’s even less of a secret that I’m sickened by spying, especially from within our own government. So I’m surprised to be writing a story in which I support China’s use of drones to spy on polluters, but here I am. Damn you, science, you’ve done it again!

Pollution in China’s major cities is a big problem — such a big problem that Beijing is developing a nuclear plant (fueled with thorium, not uranium) to try and find alternate fuel sources. Pollution is such a big problem that travel agencies offer “haze travel insurance” for travelers whose flights are canceled due to pollution or who spend two or more days in Beijing, Shanghai, Xi’ian, or other big, smoggy cities. The air pollution index has to read over a certain number in each city. In February, Shanghai’s air pollution index topped 100 on 17 days (0-50 is considered good, 51-100 moderate, and 101-200 unhealthy. Anything over 300 is considered hazardous).