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Jurassic World Introduces All Of The Dinosaur Attractions

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Jurassic WorldDuring production, Jurassic World had a slew of problems with security. A number of major plot points leaked out, and were then confirmed by those involved, most notably director Colin Trevorrow. Though Vincent D’Onofrio assures fans we still don’t anywhere near the whole story yet, since these breaches, the film has taken measures to get out in front of things. One strategy they’ve employed is their viral website, gradually revealing more and more bits of information. Through this outlet we’ve seen security footage from the park, met D’Onofrio’s sinister character, and now we’re getting our first look at many of the dinosaurs we’ll see in the new film.

Jurassic World, the fourth film in the Jurassic Park franchise, finds the park of the title now open and fully operational. It’s the biggest tourist attraction in the world, and since some people are never satisfied, the money people commission a new dinosaur made from the DNA of a T-rex, Velociraptor, snake, and cuttlefish. If you’ve ever seen a movie before, you know that’s a bad, bad idea, and this vicious new creation escapes and wreaks havoc. Chris Pratt’s character, Owen, along with a trained team of Velociraptors, has to help rein this new beast in.

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Jurassic World May Feature This Other Weird Mash Up Dinosaur

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Jurassic WorldIf you’ve been paying attention to the news and trailers for Jurassic World, you know that the big bad antagonist is a genetically enhanced dinosaur cooked up in a lab. That tidbit leaked out and was later confirmed by director Colin Trevorrow, as well as the numerous looks we’ve had at this point. But if some new toys are to be believed, the Indominus rex as it is called, may not be the only new guy floating around.

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Newly Discovered Dinosaur Could Have Weighed More Than 130,000 Pounds

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dreadnoughtusDinosaurs were big. Not all of them, of course. As we remember from Jurassic Park, some are roughly human size, while still others are small enough to fit on the passenger seat of an SUV and spit sticky, venomous loogies at Newman from Seinfeld. Still, the big ones have always been the most memorable, being, as they were, some of the largest creatures to ever exist on our planet. Now paleontologists have discovered what appears to be one of the biggest yet.

Located in the Patagonia region of Argentina, this new dino was more than 85-feet long, 30-feet tall, and weighed in at more than 130,000 pounds. And the researches believe that it was still growing when it died—it appears to be an adolescent skeleton—so who knows just how big this bad boy could have gotten before the end. The newly unearthed creature is so large, in fact, that they gave it a very size appropriate name: Dreadnoughtus. Named after a large, notoriously tough World War I-era battleship, if we’re being honest, this name sounds a little bit like a villain that Godzilla would have clashed with at some point in his long, rich filmography. Which makes us like this news even more.

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Double Dose Of Dinos: Tiny Arctic Tyrannosaur And Jurassic Park Remade With Cats

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“Cute” isn’t ordinarily a word I’d use to describe dinosaurs. Remember that one from Jurassic Park that coos sweetly at Newman, just before eating his face off? For a second I thought that little guy was cute, but I’ve since learned my lesson. Or so I thought. I just learned about a tiny little tyrannosaur that is, as the kids would say, totes adorbs.

The Nanuqsaurus, thought to roam the Earth approximately 70 million years ago, has a few distinguishing features. First off, it was only about 22 feet long. What? Is that not small? The usual T-Rex was about 40 feet, so this guy’s a veritable dino-dwarf. What’s more, its remains were found in Alaska, well north of the Arctic Circle. Yep. This cold-blooded cross between a polar bear (nanuq) and tyrannosaur apparently dug the cold. I hear it was pretty fierce at slopestyle, too.

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Fossils Of Biggest European Predator Ever Found In Portugal

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torvosaurusI spent a good chunk of last summer in Portugal, fascinated by its history — the great earthquake of 1755, the role of the country in World War II, its relationship with Brazil and Spain. But all that time I had no idea that Portugal was home to what scientists now believe was Europe’s largest predator ever — the Torvosaurus gurneyi. It’s always nice when we add to dino-discoveries, rather than take away.

Torvosaurus gurneyi was no joke — at over 30 feet long and weighing about five tons, this dinosaur could have given a T-Rex a run for its money — that is, if they had lived in the same time period. Torvosaurus is an earlier species, living in the late Jurassic period, roughly 150 million years ago. That’s about 80 million years before the good ol’ T-Rex, which shares many of its characteristics, including bi-pedal movement and a penchant for snacking on anything alive. Of course, that means Torvosaurus gurneyi had particularly impressive teeth that helped it establish its dominance.

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Jurassic World: Chris Pratt Talks Up His Character, Locations Revealed, And The Movie Will Shoot On Film

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velociraptorJurassic World, the fourth installment in a franchise that hasn’t turned out a new movie since 2001, is coming together nicely. There’s a young, interesting director, in Colin Trevorrow, and a cast headlined a guy who is about to become a huge movie star, in the person of Chris Pratt, who also called Jurassic Park his Star Wars. As we move closer to the start of production, which is reportedly about six weeks away, more details are beginning to emerge. Pratt has shed some light on his character—and in turn on the script—we’ve learned where the filming is scheduled to go down, and we have an answer to the film versus digital question.

In addition to being totally pumped about being a part of this, Pratt, hyping up The LEGO Movie at MTV, provided some details about his role, and how the script fits into the larger franchise. When asked if he was more akin Jeff Goldblum’s cynical mathematician Dr. Ian Malcolm, or Sam Neill’s cautiously enthusiastic archeologist Dr. Alan Grant, Pratt says his character falls somewhere in the middle. He says, “He’s got a little of both. He’s got little bits of the Goldblum cynicism, but also the Sam Neill excitement and the wonder in the biology. So it’s a combination.”