Search results for: asteroids

0

The Asteroids Adaptation Just Hired This Writer Pen The Video Game Space Opera

fb share tweet share

asteroidsIf we can squeeze out an entire feature length movie based on a board game as inherently plotless as Battleship (or Ouija for that matter), turning the classic arcade game Asteroids into a major motion picture should be a cakewalk, right? Okay, maybe it’s not that simple, as they’ve gone through a couple of writers already, but the production recently brought in a new face to give the script a rewrite.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, F. Scott Frazier, who wrote the upcoming racing actioner Autobahn, which hits theaters later this year and stars both Felicity Jones and Nicholas Hoult, has been hired to rework the draft of the sci-fi adventure adaptation of the beloved 1979 game (there’s a dive bar by my house that still has one of these consoles, which is awesome). Universal won what turned into a bidding war a few years ago, back in 2009, and have been working on hammering out the details ever since.

0

Planetary Resources And Zooniverse Invite You To Help Hunt Asteroids

fb share tweet share

asteroid zooThe asteroid mining company Planetary Resources has just announced the launch of the Asteroid Zoo, which is kind of like SETI, but for asteroids. The program, a collaboration between Planetary Resources and Zooniverse, the Internet’s largest collection of citizen science projects of all shapes and sizes, is designed to encourage anyone and everyone to join the hunt for Near Earth Asteroids that might be dangerous and/or full of mining potential.

0

Scientists Identify 12 Easily Retrievable Asteroids For Potential Mining

fb share tweet share

asteroidYou may wonder what good asteroids are if you can’t deftly fly your spacecraft through a field of them to impress a girl and outrun bad guys. But it turns out that asteroids are a great source of precious metals — so great that companies like Planetary Resources have already developed plans to mine asteroids. But before that happens, we have to identify and access the giant space rocks. A team at Scotland’s University of Strathclyde in Glasgow has been doing just that, scouring the skies for asteroids classified as Easily Retrievable Objects, or EROs. A recent report indicates that they’ve found a dozen ERO asteroids that could be mined with today’s rocket technology.

0

Asteroids Adaptation Will Be A Space Opera, Not A Disaster Movie

fb share tweet share

When someone tells you they’re making a movie out of the classic ’70s arcade game Asteroids, your reaction is probably similar to when you first heard Peter Berg was adapting Battleship into a movie. You cock your head like a confused dog, pause for a moment to collect the various thoughts swirling around in your head, and ask, “Huh?”

Like Battleship, there is no inherent narrative in the game, no characters, no nothing. You’re a triangle shooting periods at big empty shapes, and that’s it. From a filmmaker’s perspective it could be kind of exciting. What you have in front of you is a mostly blank canvas. You have spaceships and asteroids; make a movie out of it. There have been a number of writers attached to Asteroids at various times, including David S. Goyer (Man of Steel) and Jez Butterworth (Fair Game).

0

Help NASA Hunt Asteroids

fb share tweet share

AsteroidHaven’t you always wanted to live out Michael Bay’s Armageddon? Well, now is your chance, sort of. NASA and the White House want your help in identifying asteroids that could potentially crash into Earth with devastating effect. This is part of the administration’s 21st Century Grand Challenges, “ambitious but achievable” goals involving science and technology, and designed to engage the public. Sometimes there are prizes.

Lori Garver, NASA’s Deputy Administrator, said, “This is really a call to action to find all asteroid threats to human populations and know what to do about them.” She also takes the time to note that humans are “smarter than the dinosaurs.” It’s nice to be reminded of that sometimes, but the point would seem to be that we can hopefully avoid being wiped out by a big flying rock slamming into our planet. I certainly hope so.

The primary goal of this Grand Challenge is to aid with the location of an appropriate space rock to use in the Asteroid Redirect Mission, or ARM (formerly titled Asteroid Retrieval Mission). This is a plan to move an asteroid into a lunar orbit so astronauts can visit the site and train for the real thing. That sounds much more exciting than Ben Affleck and Bruce Willis bounding around in a swimming pool.

0

NASA Plans To Wrangle Asteroids Beginning In 2019

fb share tweet share

Asteroid

If you think NASA’s latest scheme sounds like it was lifted directly from Michael Bay’s Armageddon, then you’re not alone. The plan is to capture a small asteroid using a robotic probe and then relocate it to somewhere around the moon. This would all go down in 2019. Astronauts would then begin playing around and exploring the asteroid a few years later, in 2021.

If this happens, it will be the first time that humans have gone beyond the low levels of Earth’s atmosphere in decades. The last time we broke that barrier was in 1972 with Apollo 17. Some theorize that this could lay the groundwork for a future mission to Mars. Though there hasn’t been an official announcement from NASA, both Senator Bill Nelson, a Democrat from Florida, and an unnamed White House official have let it slip about this plan.

Nelson is himself a former astronaut—he flew on Columbia in 1986—and serves as the chairman of the Senate Science and Space Subcommittee. According to a press conference Friday, the plan involves a diminutive robotic probe, which will attempt to grab an asteroid in a device that is described as “a baggie with a drawstring.” Don’t you love it when they get all technical?