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Syfy’s Space Adventure Dark Matter Announces Cast, Get The Details Here

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Dark MatterOf the near endless supply of projects that Syfy is working to bring to the small screen, Dark Matter is one that we haven’t heard too much about in recent days. The upcoming series, which already has an order for a 13-episode first season, hails from Stargate producers Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie, who also created the comic book series the show is based on. It also just revealed it’s core cast, a list full of names that you vaguely know, and faces that you will definitely see and recognize from somewhere, though you may not be entirely certain where.

The cast features Broadway actress Melissa O’Neil, Marc Bendavid (Bitten), Alex Mallari Jr. (RoboCop), Anthony Lemke (Lost Girl, Warehouse 13), Jodelle Ferland (Cabin in the Woods), Roger Cross (The Strain), and Zoie Palmer (Lost Girl). Like I said, no one super exciting, but a lot of genre vets, a fair number of relatively recognizable faces, and some folks who have been around the block.

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Syfy Adds Even More Sci-Fi To Their Line-Up With Dark Matter

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DarkMatterSyfy just isn’t stopping, and for the first time in a long time, that’s actually a good thing. Their intriguing event series Ascension, starring Battlestar Galactica’s Tricia Helfer, premieres next month, and Syfy’s future is packed with promising projects such as The Expanse, Old Man’s War, and Childhood’s End. Now we can add yet another project to the lineup of Syfy shows we can’t wait to see, an adaptation of the Dark Horse comics series Dark Matter.

Created by Stargate writer/producers Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie, Dark Matter was a limited series that ran from January – April 2012. The story involves a group of people who awaken aboard a spacecraft with no memory of who they are or how they got there. With the vessel on course for a mining colony, the crew begins to discover the disturbing truth about their identity. Mallozzi has said that The Dirty Dozen, Thunderbolts, and the FX series The Shield all inspired the show.

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High-Tech Dark Matter Detector Comes Up Empty—For Now

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LUXDark matter is the cosmic holy grail. The elusive stuff is hypothesized to make up about 27% of the Universe (dark energy, which is something slightly different, makes up about 68%), but its existence has never been conclusively proven, largely because no one has ever actually seen the stuff. Scientists were hoping to change that with the Large Underground Xenon, LUX, which is the most sensitive, high-tech dark matter detector in existence. LUX completed its first run of experiments on Wednesday, but turned up nothing.

Before we get further into the LUX’s missoin, I want to address something I keep reading—that dark matter comprises the majority of matter in the Universe. This is where the confusion between dark energy and dark matter comes into play, and while they’re closely related, it’s not technically correct to conflate the two terms. Or at least, that’s what astrophysicists currently believe. Dark energy is a force that accounts, at least in part, for the accelerating expansion of the universe. Dark matter, on the other hand, isn’t a force—it’s, well, matter. We think it’s there and we think we’ve seen it, such as in the photo below of the Pandora’s Cluster. The areas noted by the blue and red circles indicate a separation between hot gas and dark matter. While colliding particles in gas clouds generate electrical energy that causes friction and slows them down, the dark matter remains unaffected by friction or other effects of the hot gas, leading to the separation between the two.

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The Other You Short Film Posits How Dark Matter Would Fare As A Human

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For their short film The Other You, IntoxyFilms worked with a narrow definition of dark matter in order to develop its story to the fullest, which admittedly isn’t all that much. But for a short film, one shouldn’t expect that much more. In this case, dark matter refers to matter “characterized by its total lack of interaction with visible (ordinary) matter,” and this allows for a woman — in this case, choreographer Edit Dekany — to be taken over by a being made entirely of dark matter. Slapstick comedy ensues.

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Physicists May Be Close To Cracking The Mystery Of Dark Matter

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One of the most elusive substances in the universe is dark matter. It’s an almost invisible substance that can only be identified by its gravitational pull. Now scientists and researchers may be one step closer to proving its existence and unveiling its mysteries.

According to Space.com, physicists using the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland may have discovered something that might put the supersymmetry theory — which indicates the existence of particles that are among the leading candidates for dark matter — into doubt. “I think we’re looking in enough different ways that unless it’s something that we just haven’t thought of at all yet, it seems to me we’re very likely to find it within the next decade,” said Dan Bauer, a physicist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois.

To be considered dark matter, the potential particles have to be neutral and stable, and will not interact with any other types of matter including galaxies, stars, and planets. These supersymmetric particles may be considered dark matter, but more testing and experiments have to be conducted to verify the findings. Most of the particles discovered may be categorized as heavy particles called weakly interacting massive particles.

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Astronomers May Have Just Found Direct Evidence Of Dark Matter… Or Another Weird Particle

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Back in January of this year, 3 scientists announced that they had spotted an anomaly in the gamma-ray output of three galactic clusters with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The Virgo, Coma, and Fomax clusters were putting out more gamma rays than could be accounted for by the usual natural means of pulsars or gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Not only were the three clusters putting out way more gamma rays than they should, but the source of the radiation extended three degrees out beyond the boundary of the clusters themselves in a region accountable to the theorized halo of dark matter that surrounds galaxies and their clusters.

Enter the Neutrilino (and yes that’s spelled correctly, this is not a Neutrino). The Neutrilino is a theoretical particle that has its place on the suspect list of dark matter. It is a supersymmetric particle that happens to be its own antiparticle, which means it can annihilate itself and release gamma radiation in the process. According to Skymania, a research team from Canterbury University in New Zealand thinks this may well have been what the Fermi Large Area Telescope saw when it witnessed the unusually high gamma-ray emissions.