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Ronald D. Moore On What It Was Like To Kill Kirk In Generations

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KirkDeathStar Trek: Generations definitely wasn’t the franchise’s finest hour, but it did have the major selling point of getting to see Kirk share an adventure with the Next Generation crew. Unfortunately for Kirk, that adventure ended with his death after he got a freaking bridge dropped on him. One of the two men responsible for writing that death scene was Ronald D. Moore, who went on to bring us the Battlestar Galactica reboot and Starz’s Outlander adaptation. In a new interview with Collider, Moore shares his thoughts about what it was like to be tasked with killing off a character he’d grown up idolizing.

Moore told Collider:

It was difficult, and yet I was very eager to do it. It was a really odd thing. I really wanted to do that story. I really wanted to write the death of Captain Kirk. I really wanted to do it in the movie. I remember writing the scene with Brannon [Braga], my writing partner, at the time. When I said, ‘And Kirk dies,’ I wept. It was very emotional and very strange, in the moment and all the way through the process. I’d read it in the script and I’d always be struck by what I’d just done and what we were doing, and that this was my childhood hero and I was writing his death. Even then, I didn’t quite know what to make of it. I was mystified by why I was doing it, why I was so driven to do it, and why it was affecting me like it was. I still don’t know what it means. It’s a strange singular experience. I don’t even know anyone to talk to about it because I don’t know anyone who’s had that experience.

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Malcolm McDowell Turned Down Star Trek: Generations Four Times

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McDowellOver the years, the Star Trek franchise has enlisted the skills of many actors who were already well-known beforehand. Ricardo Montalban and Benedict Cumberbatch were both proven talents before they stepped into the role of Khan Noonien Singh. Christopher Lloyd and Kelsey Grammer both had a beloved sitcom role under their belt before they appeared as a Klingon commander and a Starfleet captain, respectively. Even people like Bryan Singer, Christian Slater, and Seth MacFarlane have appeared in small roles just so they could be a part of the Trek universe. But not every actor out there is a fan, and some would rather have nothing to do with Star Trek. Case in point: Star Trek: Generations’ Malcolm McDowell.