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Japanese Beverage Company To Advertise On The Moon

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PocariOne small step for man, one giant leap for advertising.

In October of 2015, Japanese company Otsuka will send a titanium can of their beverage Pocari Sweat to the moon. There’s a little more to it than simply dumping a can on the lunar surface, though. Perhaps to temper the bad taste this campaign may leave in many mouths, the company is creating a time capsule that looks like one of their cans. This canister contains messages from kids all over Asia, engraved onto small metal disks that fit inside the container. According to Otsuka, the package “contains the children’s dreams.” Their tiny, tiny dreams. They’re even calling it the Dream Capsule. Oh, and of course there’s also a powdered form of Pocari Sweat.

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AT&T’s Early Nineties Ad Campaign Got The Future Right (For The Most Part)

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Predicting the future can be tough. Even if you’re well versed in every aspect of your reality, from the technological to the philosophical and everything in between, the force of history will often take a sharp left down a side alley you didn’t even see and roll right past you while you’re still pointing in the direction you were so certain was “the future.” Part of the fun of science fiction is that simple guesswork, imagining what things might be like 10 or 100 or 1 million years down the road, and even when you get it wrong, hey, at least it made for a hell of a story. So let us add a new prophet to the prognosticators of yore such as Isaac Asimov and Gregory Benford: Tom Selleck?

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Advertisers Can Now Broadcast Directly Into Your Skull

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Sky GoPop-up ads on the Internet have become downright rabid in recent years. How about those ads on Facebook—soon to be followed by ads on Twitter—that make it all too clear Big Brother has been paying attention to your every move? Soon, a new kind of advertisement may start invading your evening commute, when you’re wiped out from a long day’s work.

We’ve all done it. It’s 5:15, or maybe 7:15, or god forbid, 10:15, and you’re finally able to hop on a train and head home from work. You don’t care how filthy the window is—anything that helps prop up your head is a welcome addition to your world. So you lean back, shut your eyes for just a second…and then you hear a voice. You look around, but the voice is coming from inside your own head, inaudible to everyone else. Are you finally losing it, cracking under the pressure?