Search results for: torchwood miracle day

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Torchwood Writer On Where Miracle Day Went Wrong

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With Doctor Who celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, one of its little siblings unfortunately won’t be throwing any victory parties anytime soon. I speak, of course, of Torchwood, the Who spin-off featuring the adventures of the immortal Captain Jack Harkness and company. In spite of getting a big marketing push to woo American audiences for its run on Starz, Torchwood: Miracle Day was a disappointment both narratively and in the ratings department. One former Torchwood writer thinks he knows where Miracle Day went astray and lost its “essence.”

12 - The Torchwood Team_Courtesy of Starz

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The 3 Worst Logic Failures Of Torchwood: Miracle Day And Why I’ve Stopped Watching

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Like a lot of you I’ve been tuning in to Torchwood: Miracle Day. I was a big fan of the original BBC series, which was itself a spin-off of Doctor Who, and now they’ve brought the concept to America in a plot wrapped around this rather simple premise: What if one day, everyone stopped dying?

At first Miracle Day seemed to have really thought this through, the show began delving into the massive societal problems created by a world in which no one can die but people still get hurt and sick. Captain Jack Harkness and the gang ran around trying to save the day… but then something started going wrong.

One of the great strengths of Torchwood has always been its ability to cut right to the emotional core of any situation, no matter how completely bizarre or otherworldly that might be. Suddenly turned into a sex-crazed succubus? Torchwood has always been more interested in how that transformation would feel that the scientific ramifications of such a happening. But Miracle Day has taken that a step too far, and as the series has developed it seems to have abandoned all semblance of reason and logic in favor of shrill, political drum-banging and a clumsy attempt to portray the governments of the world as little better than the Nazi Party.

Here’s how they’ve screwed it up. These are the three worst examples of fuzzy thinking, logical fallacies, and just downright stupidity currently in play thanks to the inexplicably bran-dead, political-agenda driven writers of Torchwood: Miracle Day. Russell T. Davies, Jane Espenson… we expect more from you. Captain Jack Harkness deserves better ideas than these…

Warning: Spoilers follow.

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We’re Getting More Torchwood, Here’s How

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TorchwoodWith the 50th anniversary festivities in 2013 and a new Doctor to celebrate in 2014, the last two years have provided plenty to talk about when it came to Doctor Who. But what about Torchwood, the little sibling that never gets any respect? It’s been in limbo since the not-great Miracle Day, but we’d still love to see Captain Jack Harkness back in action. Well, we will be getting that wish granted…minus the “see” part.

While promoting The CW’s Arrow at the 2015 TV critics winter press conference in Pasadena this week, actor John Barrowman (Captain Jack) revealed that, while there’s no news about another season/miniseries of Torchwood, the characters will be returning in three or four planned BBC radio plays. Barrowman says the plays will be “character-based,” but hints that at least one of them will involve what the Post Gazette describes as “the whole Torchwood team.” Of course, it’s anybody’s guess what that means at this stage, since Torchwood has been notoriously brutal to the team’s membership over the years. We can assume the return of Captain Jack and Gwen Cooper (Eve Myles), but what about Mekhi Phifer’s Rex Matheson, who was certainly left in an interesting state at the end of Miracle Day? Time will tell.

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The Day Of The Doctor: 50 Things We Loved (And A Few Things We Didn’t)

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The Day of the Doctor has come and gone, and now we can all settle in to wait for the Christmas special — and with it the departure of Matt Smith and the introduction of Peter Capaldi’s Twelfth Doctor. (Okay, technically we already got a very brief introduction to him, but more on that below.) Having rewatched the 50th anniversary special a couple of times, and for the most part we quite enjoyed it. And since Doctor Who is celebrating its 50th anniversary, below we’ll run down 50 things we loved about The Day of the Doctor…and a few we didn’t.

Foreman1. The fan service starts early, with the opening shot revealing the scrap yard where viewers first saw the TARDIS way back in 1963’s ”An Unearthly Child.” We also see that Clara is teaching at the nearby Coal Hill School, the school the Doctor’s granddaughter Susan was attending when her beyond-her-years knowledge of history caught the attention of teachers Ian Chesterton and Barbara Wright. Their investigation of the mystery of Susan led to Ian and Barbara becoming the Doctor’s first traveling companions.

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Bad News For Torchwood Fans Wanting More

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Fans of Torchwood have been left hanging in the aftermath of the BBC/Starz co-produced series, Torchwood: Miracle Day. While it received a decent marketing push prior to airing in July – September 2011, Miracle Day disappointed in the ratings department, and there’s been no definitive word when/if we might see the further adventures of Captain Jack Harkness (John Barrowman) and Gwen Cooper (Eve Myles). Well, Torchwood creator/former Doctor Who showrunner Russell T Davies has been making the rounds to promote his new kids’ show, Wizards vs. Aliens, and during a radio he was asked about the future of the Who spinoff…and the news isn’t great.

During a radio interview with Irish talk show host Graham Norton, Davies said that, while Torchwood isn’t officially cancelled, he has no plans to return to it anytime soon. Here’s the quote:

I loved making it [in the States], and I would have carried on if circumstances hadn’t brought me back to this country, so it’s kind of in limbo for me at the moment.

I’m not working on it at the moment. I’m only working on Wizards vs. Aliens — when I get back to work one day, I don’t know, it’ll be old news to the BBC then! It’s not officially cancelled… It’s in a nice limbo where it can stew for a while – those shows can come back in ten, twenty years time.

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Torchwood’s Captain Jack Joins The CW’s Arrow

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Doctor Who continues to grown in popularity these days, but the future doesn’t look nearly as bright for fans of the spin-off series, Torchwood. The disappointing Torchwood: Miracle Day series took an interesting concept and killed it with molasses-slow pacing, an ironic feat for a show about a man who can’t die. Given that Miracle Day didn’t exactly light up the ratings for Starz, there’s some question whether we’ll get anymore Torchwood or if it is well and truly dead. But take heart, Torchwood fans: even if you can’t get more of the show, you can at least get more of the cast. Actor John Barrowman — Captain Jack himself — is joining the CW’s upcoming superhero action series Arrow.

Based on the DC Comics character Green Arrow, Arrow gives the character the Smallville/Batman Begins treatment, showing Oliver Queen’s path to becoming an emerald-hued, arrow-slinging vigilante. The show stars Stephen Amell as the hero, and EW reports that Barrowman will be playing a “well-dressed man … as mysterious as he is wealthy … he is an acquaintance of the Queen family and a prominent figure in Starling City.” That doesn’t exactly tell us much, so I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s playing some existing DC character and they’re trying to keep the lid on his identity until the show eventually reveals it. Sadly, the story also fails to explain why they’ve decided to change the name of Green Arrow’s hometown from “Star City” to “Starling City.” Who the hell names a city after a starling?

Greg Berlanti and Marc Guggenheim are writing for the show, and that could be good or bad news, depending on your opinion of the Green Lantern movie, which they also penned (along with Michael Green & Michael Goldenberg). Either way, the show’s got a high bar to reach — in longevity, if not in quality — if it’s going to fill the (super) boots of its predecessor, Smallville, which ran for 10 seasons.