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Star Wars Smithsonian Exhibition Delves Into The Costumes Of Far, Far Away

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SW1With new Star Wars movies on their way to theaters beginning later this year, many fans are diving back into their love of a franchise the prequels may have tarnished, or just embracing it with even more excitement and enthusiasm. Well, in between Rebels marathons and reading the comics and novels, now you can explore Star Wars’ history courtesy of a new traveling Smithsonian show focused on the franchise’s amazing costumes.

From Darth Vader’s imposing silhouette to the Rebel pilots’ orange jumpsuits or the elaborate garb of Queen Amidala, Star Wars’ costume design has been an integral part of making George Lucas’ galaxy far, far away feel rich and detailed and real. An exhibition entitled “Rebel, Jedi, Princess, Queen: Star Wars and the Power of Costume” opened in Seattle on January 31 and will remain on display at the EMP Museum through October 4, 2015, after which it will travel to 11 more as-yet-unannounced cities. The show is a collaboration between Lucasfilm, the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art, and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES).

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Smithsonian And McDonalds Both Looking To Embrace 3D Technology

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laser scanningToday brings ironic juxtaposition when it comes to the use of 3D technologies. We’ve got the Smithsonian looking to archive its artifacts using 3D imaging, and we’ve got McDonald’s thinking about 3D printing the plastic toys that come in happy meals. Well folks, technology doesn’t discriminate!

The Smithsonian, the world’s largest museum and research complex, owns about 137 million historical objects, most of which are kept tucked away from our prying eyes and greasy hands. But what’s the point of having all that awesome stuff if people can’t access it? The museum has recently arrived at a solution to the problem — 3D imaging and printing. 3D imaging involves scanning an object and rendering its image in 3D, and you all know what 3D printing is. Many of the Smithsonian’s exhibits are too large to be 3D printed — like the Wright brothers’ first airplane — but a 3D scan would allow people to get an all-over look at the historical aircraft.