0

IBM’s Watson Is About To Get Even Smarter

fb share tweet share

JeopardyWatson, IBM’s famous Jeopardy-playing AI, already seems plenty smart. It can help create new and unexpected recipes; help Africa figure out ways to improve its agricultural, educational, and medical systems; and help cure brain cancer. Oh, and it can swear up a freakin’ storm, too. But IBM isn’t done yet. The company is working on enhancing Watson’s capabilities, as well as bringing it to the commercial market.

Watson’s thrashing of its human opponents in Jeopardy was just the start. If you watch it play, you’ll notice that Watson’s intelligence is specifically designed for game show success. It’s got the format down, including the phraseology and the buzzing in, and it calculates the probability of its answers being correct, as well as other possible answers. But this isn’t really intelligence as much as it is glorified and speedy search engine use. IBM is working on making Watson better at answering questions, but not just by searching through data repositories—they want the system to be able to integrate knowledge and information based on previous questions and answers.

0

IBM’s Watson Is Also A Machine In The Kitchen

fb share tweet share

chef watsonIBM’s Watson is an impressive machine. In addition to kicking some major ass on Jeopardy, Watson has also directed its profound intelligence—or at least, ability to compile and analyze information—toward curing cancer, helping countries in Africa devise better systems for farming, education, and health care. Now, the machine’s got a new hobby: cooking. Or perhaps more accurately, creating new recipes.

Bon Appetit has partnered with IBM to test Watson’s meddle in the kitchen. It makes sense—as much as cooking can benefit from inspiration and innovation, there are unlikely combinations of foods that produce taste and texture results that those of us who aren’t chemists or molecular gastronomists might never be aware of. For those of you who watched House, remember when Dr. House took up cooking as a hobby to distract him from gobbling pills? He was amazing at it, because, well, because he’s amazing at everything, but also because of his precise scientific mind. And something tells me not even House can keep up with Watson, if only because Watson can keep all 9,000 Bon Appetit recipes it scanned while learning about culinary compounds and mixtures stored in its data banks.

0

Watson Turns His Supercomputer Brain Towards Africa

fb share tweet share

African childrenYou might be wondering what the Jeopardy-playing, foul-mouthed supercomputer Watson has been up to lately. It seems the AI has turned over a new leaf, it’s gone from celebrating linguistic vulgarities to helping Africa solve some of its biggest problems.

This new $100 million project is called Lucy, named after the earliest human fossil found in Ethiopia in 1974, and will last approximately 10 years. IBM thinks that Watson can use his super powers (i.e. his artificial but mighty intelligence) to help solve some widespread and difficult issues, such as improving agriculture, education, and health in the region. That sounds awesome, but does that mean IBM has never set Watson to any of these tasks before? Why not try it out on some smaller-scope issues, such as the Affordable Care Act website?

0

IBM’s Supercomputer Watson Gets Censored Like A Bitch

fb share tweet share

IBM supercomputer Watson

I remember being very young and playing quiz games on one of the earliest versions of Windows, and writing curse words for answers, because I didn’t know how feudal systems worked back then, and I wasn’t afraid of the 8-bit host punishing me. Then I remember when cursing really came into its own in video games, and it was almost liberating to hear these naughty words coming out of these wooden voiceover actors. Well, we’ve come to a point in society where it ain’t worth fussin’ over cussin’ for most people, but general tact remains. Thus, we can’t go letting our computers call all the women “slut sausage,” now can we?

IBM research scientist Eric Brown is the creator of the supercomputer Watson, the ever-learning electro-genius that stomped a mudhole in Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter’s behinds on Jeapordy!; or should I say “asses?” It turns out Watson’s language lessons in Urban Dictionary didn’t drill home only the casual slang as Brown may have hoped, and the computer was unable to distinguish slang from profanity. Talk about a real Android Dice Clay, am I right? Well, if he looked like a person, I would be.