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Five(ish) Sci-Fi Movies Roger Ebert Championed More Than He Should Have

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roger ebertToday, over a year after his death, film critic extraordinaire Roger Ebert would have been 72 years old. Chances are, he would have had a few key points to make about how awesome Edge of Tomorrow is, and how terrible Pompeii and The Legend of Hercules are. Or maybe it would have been the other way around, as Ebert’s opinions were often as surprising as the twists in the films he wrote about. In honor of arguably the last great movie critic, we decided to take a look back at five of his more egregious sci-fi reviews, when he stood on the opposite end of popular opinion. It just goes to show us all that subjectivity is inherent to mankind, as is the need to scream “Bullshit!” when we disagree with someone.

Admittedly, most of these are modern sci-fi pics, as his thoughts on the classics are largely unchallenged. I mean, we could have taken a whole day just to rail on Ebert for shitting on some decent movies, such as Day of the Dead, The Lost Skeleton of Cadavra, and Sphere — and I’m fully aware that some of you will likely shit on me for thinking those movies are decent — but maybe we’ll save that for next year. Until then, may the Force blah blah blah.

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The Matrix Wins Lawsuit, Wasn’t Actually About Jesus Fighting Nazis

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the matrixIt appears writer Thomas Althouse took the red pill this week, or rather was force-fed a red pill and told to go on about his day. Last year, Althouse took Warner Bros., Andy and Lana Wachowski, and Joel Silver to court, alleging the filmmaking siblings ripped off his unproduced screenplay The Immortals with The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions. A California federal court ruled the properties were dissimilar and spooned Althouse’s lawsuit right out of the door. (There is no spoon.)

Judge R. Gary Klausner ruled “the basic premises of The Matrix trilogy and The Immortals are so different that it would be unreasonable to find their plots substantially similar.” This is where I’d make a joke about how Althouse’s script was about a youth league football team who needs to win the big game, but the actual plot is even more vastly different.

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Cross The Streams With The Matrix: Revolutions, Jean-Claude Van Damme, And Christian Slater

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There’s a pretty good chance you’re still too busy with holiday events or traveling to sit around watching movies and TV on the Internet. And that’s probably a good thing in this case, as the titles we have for you in this week’s Cross the Streams are only worth your time if you’re into bad movies or interesting nonfiction series. Depends on if you took the blue pill or the red pill, I guess.

The Matrix: Revolutions
The Matrix: Revolutions (Amazon Prime Instant)
It’s hard to believe it’s been ten years since I felt the supreme disappointment that accompanied me as I walked out of the theater after watching The Matrix: Revolutions. There was obviously no way it would be better than the original film, but I’d hoped the Wachowskis would have spent as much time on the story as they did on that massive battle scene, the one part of the movie worth the watch, even though it looks much more dated than I would have expected. As part of a trilogy marathon to show your kids or your friend who was trapped in that gravel pit for the last 20 years, it’s probably worth going back to, but never as a standalone.

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The Matrix Trilogy Gets An Honest Trailer

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In 1999, the Wachowskis released a game-changer of a science fiction movie called The Matrix. The film was ahead of its time, with amazing visual effects, story design, and action sequences. It brought the Wachowskis into the mainstream, and spawned countless copycats in the years that followed. Four years later, the Wachowskis would release two sequel films, The Matrix: Reloaded and The Matrix: Revolutions, which built upon the mythology of the original. Sadly, the sequel films were just shells of their predecessor’s greatness.