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Japanese Posters For Alien, Enemy Mine, And Others Are Bonkers In The Best Way

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I may not be sure of many things in this life, but one thing I am sure of is that the Japanese posters for some of my favorite science fiction films are straight-up bonkers, and in the very best way possible. Sometimes it’s just that the Japanese lettering plastered all over everything is actually perfectly consistent with the universe of the story, as with this Blade Runner poster.

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Beyond The Planet Of The Apes: Six Seventies Sci-Fi Movies Worth Remaking

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ApesWith Dawn of the Planet of the Apes proving that the 2011 Rise was no fluke, it’s clear that all it takes to revive a languishing sci-fi property is the right combination of passion, talent, and vision. (And a decade or so to forget about any terrible Tim Burton versions.) So with Caesar staging a conquest of the box office ($103 million worldwide so far), we here at GFR put our heads together to come up with other 1970s science movies primed for a resurrection. Some of them are cult classics, some of them are forgettable, and some of them are downright lamentable, but they’ve all got at least a small kernel of potential to become something awesome…if they can find the right people to guide them.

Hit the link to see our first pick!

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Soylent Aims To Replace Meals

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soylentSay it with me: “Soylent Green is people!” After seeing that movie (or the MST3K episode featuring it), it’s hard to imagine anyone making a product called Soylent, much less anyone eating it. But hey, it’s the 21st century — it’s not all that hard to imagine anything anymore, is it? Get ready to dig into a hearty bag of Soylent!

The meal-replacement product was developed by three guys in San Francisco who were sinking under enormous rent and other costs of living in the city, including the cost of food. Apparently, living on ramen and McDonald’s dollar meals wasn’t all that pleasant. One of the guys, Rob Rhinehart, decided that he’d rather not have to eat at all (who can blame him, given his diet?) So Rhinehart, a former engineering student, started to approach the problem like an engineer would. He figured that the high-water content of most nutritious foods was inefficient and wondered if there was a more effective way to get amino acids and lipids and all the nutrients we need to survive.