0

Autonomous Robotic Jellyfish, Because the World Isn’t Scary Enough

fb share tweet share

There’s nothing particularly new about roboticists creating mechanical versions of some of nature’s creatures for research purposes, but in the cases of honeybees and whirligigs, the threat of crippling nightmares is minimal. But once people start devising gigantic robotic jellyfish, it’s time to invest in a lunar time share.

0

Robot Will Use Your Home’s Dirt As A Power Source

fb share tweet share

Robot

Since I started writing for this website, I’ve noticed — though I’ve pretended not to — the Giant Freakin’ Robots lurking around behind me, blending into the environment. You see, sometimes I say bad things about them. So to counter that, we have to tell you things about more passive, non-giant, non-freakin’ robots. Like the ones that played the Beatles’ “Come Together,” the spider dress, and the one that vomits. We even mention minor felonies like theft, which they assist in in the future, if Hollywood is to be believed.

Well, this robot can not only traverse many obstacles, taking out every thing in its way using honeycomb-inspired wheels to get taller and shorter depending on the hair-raising situation it finds itself caught in, but it also gets part of its energy from everything it destroys. It’s called Limbo, it was designed by Elliot Cohen and Neil Vincetnti, and yeah, okay, all it does is clean things. But it’s like a Mars rover by way of Batman, and is environmentally sound, so save your jeers for that slacker-ass Roomba. It’s always more pleasing when the only things robots are taking out are filth and other robots.

Beyond the self-adjusting wheels, the autonomous Limbo uses Microbial Electrolysis, which harnesses the power of the bacteria from the vacuumed waste and uses that as a power source. A machine that derives its energy from doing the task it is assigned to do. Seems like the closest to an applicable perpetual motion machine that we’re gonna see, assuming the owner doesn’t mind living in absolute squalor to appease his or her new Limbo demigod.

0

Robotic Snakes Will Hug (Strangle) Whatever They’re Thrown Against

fb share tweet share

Surrounded by Louisiana wetlands, I’ve seen my fair share of snakes. Without a textbook knowledge of what’s what, I just keep a cool head and haul ass unassumingly, so that the experience is no longer the pants-shitting experience it is for some people. However, a snake that is also a questionably malevolent robot is not something I’m used to.

The geniuses at Carnegie Mellon University have been terrorizing robotic mice for years with their slithering metal reptiles, but they’ve recently showcased a video for what they call “perching,” though it is essentially grasping onto whatever it is thrown against, much like a python around an enemy predator, or a robotic snake around an innocent person’s throat. Check out the video below and accept the fact that slap bracelets have been harbingers of doom all along.

0

28 Days Later’s Alex Garland Helming Indie Robot Thriller Ex Machina

fb share tweet share

Garland

We might as well pull the band-aid off the wound real quick right here and say that this story sadly isn’t about the beyond excellent Ex Machina superhero comic series from Brian K. Vaughan, which is supposedly being developed by the production company Benderspink, which I’ll believe when I’m leaving the theater.

But that disappointment shouldn’t last too long, as DNA Films’ Ex Machina project sounds quite interesting in its own right. It will be the directorial debut for British novelist/screenwriter Alex Garland, who also penned the screenplay. Garland is a favorite of this site, as he was the screenwriter for one of the best zombie films ever, 28 Days Later, and the amazing-until-the-end space thriller Sunshine, both of which were directed by Danny Boyle, for whom Garland also adapted his novel The Beach. Garland also wrote the screenplays for the recent Dredd adaptation and the strange 2010 sci-fi drama Never Let Me Go.

The Ex Machina in question is an artificially intelligent female robot developed by a billionaire programmer. The story will follow an employee of the billionaire, who is hand-picked to spend a week at a remote estate testing the robot out, and it’s assumed that dangerous HAL-like jinks ensue. (HAL-jinks?) Considering it’s a thriller, something tells me it won’t be a immature series of failed sex acts.

The film is looking for a production shoot in the summer or the fall with an estimated budget of $15 million, which is just enough for a single-setting suspense-filled feature. It would be interesting in lesser hands, but this seems like the perfect vaulting point for Garland to take over cinema.

0

Robots Now Have A Cloud-Based Internet, Because Dammit

fb share tweet share

Robot

“Remember when there was a time without all these blasted robots?” You’ll ask, receiving no response since everyone you know will have been replaced by robots. If nothing is scarier to you than intelligent robots, this next story is going to bring you night terrors.

It hasn’t been that long since cloud computing and cloud storage revolutionized networking and remote storage, but robots now have that same capability, as the Rapyuta launches globally. Rapyuta, which takes its name from Hayao Miyazaki’s animated masterpiece Castle in the Sky, is a web-based data network that more or less serves as an expansive how-to guide on doing just about anything that robots can do. The robot doesn’t even have to be intelligent anymore since any bit of information it needs is right at its grubby, metal fingertips.

Say a bot needed to clean all the windows on the Empire State Building. Somebody somewhere input the information detailing the number of windows on the skyscraper, and the size of each, and the robot will know exactly the area of the windows it’ll be cleaning. The same goes for it frying an egg, putting together a model airplane, or reattaching a muffler. If the information is out there, the robot can retrieve it, and since the information won’t be a part of the robot’s circuitry, this will free up memory storage and be a much cheaper alternative to loading them up with tons of digital information and processors to make all that info functional.

0

Bartending Robot Is Way Cooler Than Non-Bartending Robots

fb share tweet share

Even though the best bar I’ve ever been to has been closed for years, I still recall it fondly. While I’ve been buddies with bartenders before, this was the only place where I became friends with almost everyone who ended up working there. The 6 a.m. closing time may have helped that. If you’d have asked me then how I’d have felt about replacing any of them with a bartending robot, I would have been aghast, then curious, then signing whatever dotted line I needed to. Sorry, friends!

Bartendro