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Pariah Director To Adapt Philip K. Dick’s Schizophrenic Martian Time-Slip

Martian Time SlipMovie adaptations of Philip K. Dick stories are a hit and miss proposition. For every Blade Runner or Minority Report you get something like a Next with Nicholas Cage. But a bumpy track record certainly isn’t going to stop people from trying, or at least it hasn’t yet. The latest in the long line of filmmakers looking to bring Dick to the big screen is Pariah director Dee Rees, who is now set to adapt the prolific writer’s 1964 sci-fi novel Martian Time-Slip.

According to Deadline, the Independent Spirit Award-winning Rees will write the script with Dick’s daughter, Isa Dick Hackett, with the intention of directing the film herself. That must be a pretty cool experience, working on adapting a Philip K. Dick novel with his own flesh and blood. Electric Shepherd Productions will handle all of the various producing duties on the project.

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Philip K. Dick’s Favorite Writing Music Gets A Playlist

Philip K. DickAll writers I know—and all artists, I presume—have their to-go inspirational writing music. I have countless playlists in iTunes for the various moods I need to inhabit in order to produce the kind of piece I’m working on. Emotional personal essays warrant the “sad writing mix,” while most GFR posts get the “Mars mix” (IDM, mostly) or a dose of the “happyfuntime mix.” Most of my good writing music doesn’t have lyrics, as they tend to distract me from coming up with my own words, and few mixes have the kind of driving bass I’d want on the dance floor. Regardless, the relationship between music and art production is fascinating, which makes me particularly excited to get an earful of what legendary sci-fi author Philip K. Dick listened to when he wrote.

Widely loved inside sci-fi circles and out, the Hugo Award winning Dick’s influence has reached people who probably aren’t even aware of it. Many of his 44 books have been made into popular movies. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? became Blade Runner and PKD also wrote A Scanner Darkly, Total Recall, The Adjustment Bureau, Minority Report, Next, Paycheck, and Screamers.

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Philip K. Dick’s The Man In The High Castle Coming From Ridley Scott & Syfy

HighCastle

There’s an up-and-coming force to be reckoned with when it comes to science fiction in Hollywood. A man who goes by the not-very-well known name of Philip K. Dick. There’s no point in drawing out this dumb introduction, seeing as how Dick seems to be one of four science fiction authors that screenwriters are able to get past a film company’s front lines.

This time, Ridley Scott’s Scott Free Productions is producing an adaptation of Dick’s novel, The Man in the High Castle, turning it into a four-part miniseries for Syfy. All right, now, keep your groans to a minimum. Electric Shepherd Productions, which handles production duties for Dick’s estate, will co-produce with Headline Pictures. Back in 2010, Headline was supposed to have turned the project into a BBC miniseries, but the gods seriously fucked everybody over on that one.

Screenwriting duties fall to sci-fi scribe Frank Spotnitz, who is writing the first two hours and will supervise whoever comes in for the second half. Spotnitz is known for his work as a writer/producer on The X-Files, Millennium, and most recently the Melissa George series, Hunted. To me, he’ll always be revered as the guy who created the X-Files spin-off, The Lone Gunmen, which never gets mentioned enough in the “cancelled too soon” conversations.

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The Philip K. Dick Android Is Back!

Looks like the Philip K. Dick-bot won’t be retiring (or retired) anytime soon. After the original got misplaced a few years ago on a plane trip to California (Rick Deckard, was that you?), Hanson Robotics decided to build a bigger, better version:

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Read Philip K. Dick’s Letter About Blade Runner

It’s one of the saddest footnotes in SF history that Philip K. Dick not only didn’t live to see what a profound effect Blade Runner had on both the genre and on filmmaking as a whole, he didn’t even survive long enough to see the film’s release. Dick passed away on March 2, 1982, a mere three months before Blade Runner hit theaters on June 25th. Thankfully, Dick had at least seen footage and read the scripts, so he was aware of the shape the film was taking. Now the official Philip K. Dick website has posted a letter Dick wrote in October 1981, expressing his excitement and expectations for Blade Runner to Jeff Walker of the Ladd Company.

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