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Ghostbusters, The Matrix & More Recast And Reimagined As Vintage Posters

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GhostbustersHere at GFR we’re big fans of so-called “retro posters.” The best example is artist Juan Ortiz’s excellent collection of Star Trek posters, one for each of the Original Series’ episodes. Using a variety of looks and styles, Ortiz has represented each Trek episode in its own unique way, from aping classic science fiction paperback covers to riffing on vintage movie poster designs. Artist Peter Stults’ “What if…” collection begins with that latter concept, but then takes it a step further. Rather than just designing a new poster for Ghostbusters that looks like it’s from the 1950s, he actually stops to consider who might have starred in Ghostbusters if it had been made back then. The only question is, which ‘buster would Christopher Lee, Vincent Price, Peter Cushing, Woody Strode each be playing, respectively? (Who says Winston has to be the black guy? These are enlightened fake vintage posters, damn it!)

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The Matrix, Donnie Darko, And More Get Classy With Fake Criterion Covers

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CriterionIf you’re not a die-hard cinephile, you might know know what “the Criterion Collection” is. The high-end Blu-ray and DVD publisher releases “important classic and contemporary films.” A quick survey of their new and coming soon listings include titles like It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights, and Richard Linklater’s Slacker. Being a high-falutin’ line as they are, they don’t have nearly as many science fiction films represented as they should. Artist Peter Stults decided to remedy that.

Okay, so he can’t actually make Criterion give fancy-schmancy new releases to flicks like The Matrix and Starship Troopers…but he can ape the visual style of Criterion’s cover art to show what those hypothetical Blu-rays might look like. For instance, check out this classy image that could adorn a Donnie Darko Criterion version. Like many Criterion releases, it’s evocative and symbolic, latching on to important visual elements from the film, in this case the pages from Roberta Sparrow’s The Philosophy of Time Travel.

DonnieDarko