0

Boba Fett’s Iconic Mask Gets Its Own Infographic

fb share tweet share

FettSmallJust the other day, I made a comment in mixed company that if my wife and I ever got another dog, we should name it Boba. My wife then asked why I would want a dog named Boba, to which a friend said something like, “Because Boba Fett is the coolest character in the Star Wars universe.” While this story would be cooler if it was about my Force talent of making my friends say exactly what I’m thinking, it’s actually about hyper-specific details in Star Wars history: the evolution of Boba Fett’s instantly recognizable mask. Believe it or not, it wasn’t manifested in a dream from the Gods of Awesome.

The Dented Helmet, a website specializing in the entire Boba Fett costume (because the Internet is awesome), researched and designed an infographic that tracks the artistic path taken by each of the six original helmets created in the U.K. for the “Super Trooper” project. (You can click the image above for a larger version.) It’s hard to imagine Boba Fett beginning like as a Broken Lizards movie, but that would make a nifty spinoff idea if the bounty hunter ever indeed gets his own standalone picture. I’m pretty sure you can make a bong out of that mask.

0

Star Wars Infographic Tracks How The Franchise Changed The World

fb share tweet share

SWInfoSmallThere’s no question that George LucasStar Wars is one of the most influential bits of pop culture in history. It’s earned billions of dollars, conquered pretty much every medium on the planet, and hooked several generations of fans. With Disney’s purchase of Lucasfilm and new Star Wars projects in the works across the board, that pervasive influence isn’t going to die out anytime soon. But, aside from purely financial data, how can we measure the ripples Star Wars has made in our world? The folks at Wired set out to answer that question with the massive infographic below. (Click the image up top for a larger version.)

0

Think You’re A Real Geek? This Infographic Will Test Your Knowledge.

fb share tweet share

50-questionable-things-a-geek-should-knowtopThe older we get, the more information we’re supposed to be retaining, which is fine when most of that information is of importance. But the minutiae of life and its many avenues can replace the essential facts with the mundane ones, such as remembering every word to every TGIF sitcom on ABC in the 1990s. Luckily, VirtualHosting.com has put together an infographic listing 50 things you should be aware if if you consider yourself part of geek culture. We’re going to break it down into sections below, but if you want to see the full unbroken graphic, just hit the link above.

Now that “geek chic” has been officially added to the online Oxford Dictionary, it’s become something of a mini-industry unto itself. It’s no longer only poindexters with square-rimmed glasses and pocket protectors getting all the credit. It takes more than just wearing a Star Trek t-shirt these days. Keep track of how many of these you can answer, for there is a scoring scale at the bottom. Scoring scales are so fashionable. First up, movies and TV.

0

The Ultimate Sci-Fi Size Chart Shows You How The Enterprise Stacks Up Against Godzilla

fb share tweet share

FaceOffTo tweak a quote from the late Douglas Adams, science fiction is big. Really big. When the potential span of your subject matter encompasses the entirety of space, time, and existence, it makes sense that science fiction often goes big. Giant robots. Giant starships. Giant monsters. But with all that enormity running amok across the genre, how’s a guy to keep track of precisely how big any of it is? Why, with the handy-dandy chart below, created by DeviantArtist lexinator117 and dubbed “Size Comparison of EVERYTHING.” Well, perhaps not “EVERYTHING,” but still enough things to be entertaining.

You can go see the full, ginormous image here, or you can the chart out in chunks below (via Popsci), along with our occasional commentary. You can also click each of the images below for larger versions. It’s also worth noting that Popsci’s editing seems to have left a few of the subjects trimmed out, but you can see the full-size image for where they fit in.

From smallest to largest (with a few exceptions noted), we’ve got:

Chart1Sm

0

Pacific Rim Movie Math Infographic Adds Up All The Cinematic Non-Anime Influences

fb share tweet share

movie math
This past weekend, America did a fine job proving that if a movie doesn’t have a number 2 behind its name, it doesn’t deserve to win the weekend. I know not every reader on this website was as gung-ho about Pacific Rim as we were, but I have to assume that no one thought that a weekend of aggravating-ass Minions and an Adam Sandler/Kevin James team-up could possibly be a better time at the theater. But there’s no point in me blaming America for its woes. Maybe the film just didn’t have the right formula for success. And I’d have thought “robots vs. monsters” sounded like heaven to everybody.

0

Death In The 20th Century Infographic

fb share tweet share

Looking back at the 20th century, during which I lived my first 18 years, I can remember so many good things about life, and the rapid developments in electronics and medicine made it an exciting time to be alive. That is, for those people who stayed alive.

As commissioned in November 2012 by the Wellcome Collection to create a piece to accompany their exhibit “Death: A Self-Portrait – The Richard Harris Collection,” designer David McCandless created the below infographic, which gives estimated but informed totals for all the different ways people died during the 20 century. His use of warm reds and bright yellows do their part to buoy viewers’ spirits, but this is a tidal wave of humbling facts that force part of the brain to consider the fate that awaits it. I’ll have to assume by its lack of an inclusion on the list that “smothered by perky breasts” isn’t as common a way to go as I’d hoped. The image below is just a small part of the huge infographic, but you can click here for the full-size version. It’s more than worth your time, while you still have it.

InfoSmall