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Galaxy Quest Producer Still Holding Out Hope For A Sequel Or Series

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GalaxyIf this was a fair and just universe, Galaxy Quest would have come out and dominated the box office, and we’d all be standing in line for Galaxy Quest XIII right now. The sci-fi comedy deftly skewered the tropes and cliches of Star Trek, as well as science fiction in generals and conventions in particular. As it stands, however, the film did a decent bit of business, pulling in around $71 million here in the States, against a $45 million budget. And obviously those voodoo dolls I picked up at the thrift shop don’t work because here we sit, nearly 14 years later, and there’s only one friggin’ Galaxy Quest movie. But perhaps we shouldn’t give up all hope that the adventures of actors-cum-galactic heroes Jason Nesmith (Tim Allen), Gwen DeMarco (Sigourney Weaver), Alexander Dane (Alan Rickman) and the rest might continue…in some form.

Galaxy Quest producer Mark Johnson has gone on to no shortage of success in the years since the sci-fi comedy hit theaters, having recently served as an executive producer on one of the best damn TV shows in history, AMC’s Breaking Bad, and on Sundance’s critically acclaimed Rectify. We ran across a Flavorwire interview with Johnson from this past April, and while the bulk of it is focused on those two shows, the reporter does lob in the Galaxy Quest question there at the end, god bless ‘em. And the news is…noncommital. But not totally hopeless. So we’ll call that a win, then.

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Imagine If J.J. Abrams Directed Galaxy Quest

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Galaxy Quest is a great movie, one that has a strong following, but is largely underappreciated. Dean Parisot’s 1999 sci-fi comedy manages to be a pitch perfect spoof of Star Trek, the infamous personas of the cast, and Trekkie culture in general, while still being a love letter to the franchise and its devoted fans. In fact, it’s such a good Star Trek movie, that fans at a recent convention actually voted it number seven on a list of the best films of the family. And what film was voted as the worst Star Trek feature, you might ask? Well that was the most recent installment, this past summer’s J.J. Abrams-directed Star Trek Into Darkness. A fun new fan made video explores what could have happened had Abrams directed Galaxy Quest. We would be talking about a very different film indeed. And who knows, maybe once he’s done with Star Wars he’ll reboot the Tim Allen vehicle.

First off in this reimagining, if Abrams helmed Galaxy Quest it would bear the overly serious subtitle The Omega 13 Prophecies. That sounds suitably Abrams-esque. The tone is also much more stern and straightforward action drama. You can see how this enterprising fan re-edits the footage from the source in a nod to the director’s penchant for humorless melodrama. Not that Abrams’ films are without joy, it’s just that, especially in his two Star Trek films, the humor is more of a deadpan sort, the polar opposite of Galaxy Quest. You may also notice a lack of Abrams’ trademark, and oft debated, lens flare. I’m okay with that.

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Be Good: Eight Family Friendly SF Flicks To Double-Feature With E.T.

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Steven Spielberg’s classic film E.T. hit Blu-ray this week, so I got to thinking about something that’s one of my favorite things to do: a double-feature. Sure, sometimes the schedule is so hectic that you’re luck to be able to sit through one movie, much less two. But there’s just something enormously satisfying about the double feature, especially if you’ve put some thought into picking the perfect pair of films, whether they’re united by genre, theme, creative talent, or even some obscure joke only you and your friends understand.

I’m betting some of you will be picking up E.T. on Blu-ray and watching it for the first time in a while, or maybe ever showing it to your kids for the first time ever. Because GFR is a full-service kind of place, I’ve sifted through the heaps of cinematic history and pulled out eight family friendly science fiction movies that will pair quite nicely with E.T.. We hope the results will be something to phone home about (ahem).

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Barba-Hell-No: Seven Movies That Should Be TV Shows Before Barbarella

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A few weeks ago when it was announced that the director of Drive was working on a Barbarella TV series, my brain experienced a cognitive dissonance that gave me a concussion. Why would a fellow as talented Nicolas Winding Refn want anything to do with a movie that I’d only ever heard bad things about? Things like “That movie made me bleed from the eyeballs,” or “That movie stole all my traveler’s checks and then punched me in the solar plexus.” Never having seen the film, I realized my preconceptions could be wrong. Perhaps Barbarella contained some unseen brilliance just waiting for me to discover it. So I watched it.

Let me just say this: there are a lot of people out there that have a serious mad-on for Barbarella actress Jane Fonda. Some would claim this is because of her politics, or because of her actions during the Vietnam War that earned her the nickname “Hanoi Jane.” I’m here to tell you that those are red herrings. Anyone who hates Jane Fonda has unquestionably been forced to sit through Barbarella at some point. This is a movie that made me question mankind’s capacity for goodness. This is a movie that made me bored of the mostly naked female form. I’m pretty sure this movie gave me diabetes.

I still don’t know whether Nicolas Winding Refn has been kidnapped and is being forced to make a Barbarella TV series at gunpoint, but all of this did get me thinking. Thinking of all the science fiction movies that are more deserving of the TV treatment than Barbarella. That list is practically endless, but here are seven of them.

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Galaxy Quest Has An R-Rated Director’s Cut

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Galaxy Quest is one of those underrated classics that everybody loves when they think about it, but which doesn’t get mentioned all that often in the pop-culture conversation. That’s a shame, because it was a pitch-perfect satire of Star Trek‘s conventions (not to mention Star Trek conventions) that also happened to be a better Star Trek movie than the franchise itself had provided in years at the time. It’s quotable, it’s hilarious, and in a perfect world, it would have spawned a long-running franchise. Of course, that might have deprived Harry Potter fans of their Severus Snape, but that would have been a small price to pay for more adventures of Commander Peter Taggart (actually actor Jason Nesmith, actually actor Tim Allen), Lt. Tawny Madison (actually actress Gwen DeMarco, actually actress Sigourney Weaver), and Dr. Lazarus (actually actor Alexander Dane, actually actor Alan Rickman).

Galaxy Quest is also one of those rare movies that is equally enjoyable for all age groups. Grups will love the sly references to the SF shows they grew up loving, while kids will love the silliness and the adventure. That being the case, it’s kind of hard to believe that Galaxy Quest‘s original director’s cut was an R-rated version complete with naughty words and other shenanigans. That’s according to John Carter producer Lindsey Collins, who told Collider that she learned of the film’s more adult origins from Sigourney Weaver herself. Find out what Collins said about it after the jump:

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The 10 Most Loveable Alien Creatures In Science Fiction

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Anyone who spends a moment thinking it over can name an array of alien creatures that are memorable. Science fiction is rife with critters that have made an impact on fans in an indelible fashion. The Buggers in Ender’s Game made us ultimately look at ourselves and question whether the monsters who will arrive to destroy humanity aren’t already there in the mirror. But no one ever remembers the aliens that demand to be hugged and squeezed and loved.

These are the ones being honored today. The most trustworthy and loyal of friends, cutest balls of joys, and most earnest of alien friends have too long been ignored. Sure, some creatures on the list below do have a layered lesson to teach, but each is loveable in their own way.

Of course an alien is not going to be loveable in exactly the same way a human is, or even a pet. In order for a sci fi creature to be considered it has to first of all actually be an alien (sorry Gizmo, you’re cute but also some sort of demony rat thing). Once we’ve established the alien cred, there’s one simple question to be answered: does the alien bring about honest to goodness joy? Misty eyes, an audible sigh, and a knowing smile to yourself are all good signs you’ve found yourself a loveable alien.