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Astronaut Chris Hadfield’s Memoir Is Being Turned Into An ABC Comedy Pilot

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astronaut's guideWith America’s newfound attention to conquering space still in its relative infancy, it’ll be a few more years before a new class of astronauts implants their names and achievements in our minds. (Not that I’m trying to downplay the hardworking astronauts of today, but society at large is slow on the upkeep.) But one space-goer, Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield, made quite a name for himself last year by turning the International Space Station into a social media hub. His life and times are about to meet a much larger audience as his memoir An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth has been given a pilot commitment by ABC. The Astronaut Broadcasting Company?

The 2013 memoir, with a full title of An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything, was at the center of a heated bidding war between networks, with ABC coming out on top. They’ve only given the project a pilot order, with no guarantee for the future, but I guess if anyone knows what questionable futures are like, astronauts do.

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Chris Hadfield’s Space Oddity Cover Is About To Vanish From YouTube

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If you’re a regular reader of GFR, there’s a pretty good chance you’ve got a serious nerd crush on Canadian astronaut/former ISS commander Chris Hadfield, whose social media updates from the International Space Station were both fascinating and addictive, all culminating in his covering David Bowie’s “Space Oddity”…from space. If you somehow managed to miss that historic moment, you can watch it right now up top. Well, so long as “right now” for you is within the next few hours of when I’m writing this, anyway. Hadfield announced via Twitter that the “Space Oddity” video would be coming down later today.

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Astronaut Chris Hadfield’s New Book Gets A Trailer And A 2001 Reference

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Are you an astronaut recently returned to Earth’s surface after a long mission in space? Are you finding it difficult to adjust back here on the homeworld? Is your stubborn refusal to remove your spacesuit having a negative effect on your daily life, commute, and competitive skateboarding obsession? Fear not, because Chris Hadfield is here to help.

Retired Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield returned to Earth this past May, after serving a stint as commander of the International Space Station. During his time aboard the ISS, Hadfield became something of a celebrity thanks to his extensive interactions with the public via social media and YouTube. Beyond the simple novelty of broadcasting from a place most of us will never visit, Hadfield’s posts and videos answered simple but intriguing questions about living and working in microgravity, such as “What happens when you wring out a soaked washrag?” or “How do you make a sandwich in zero-g?” He even showed off his musical side, first performing a duet with Barenaked Ladies singer Ed Robertson and then later serenading us with his cover of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity.”

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Astronaut Chris Hadfield Sings Space Oddity Before Returning Home From The ISS

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If you’re a regular GFR reader, the name Chris Hadfield probably rings a bell or two. During the Canadian astronaut’s five-month mission as the commander of the International Space Station, he’s become a social media sensation thanks to his videos, pictures, and even songs he’s shared with those of us down here on planet Earth. He’s answered questions we didn’t even know we had. What happens if you wring out a washcloth in microgravity? Been there. Can you cry in space? He doesn’t recommend it. Nachos, however, are a-okay.

Well, it’s the end of an era, because earlier this evening Hadfield boarded a Russian Soyuz capsule and began his trip back to the surface, along with American astronaut Tom Marshburn and Russian Roman Romanenko. They’re set to touch down in the steppes of Kazakhstan later tonight. But Hadfield had one last treat for us, seen up above: a cover of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity”…from space!

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Chris Hadfield Explains Water (And Urine) Conservation On The ISS

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I give all the respect in the world to people like Yuri Gagarin, Neil Armstrong, and Buzz Aldrin — and by “people like them,” I mean astronauts. That said, Chris Hadfield is quickly becoming the most relevant astronaut ever. He appears on our site quite frequently, showing us space nachos and letting us listen to the ambient sounds of the International Space Station. It will be a sad day in a couple of months when he comes back to Earth, but there’s no reason to cry in space about it.

Crying would be a waste of water anyway. Except the ISS is a self-sustaining environment and doesn’t have time for wasted water, as Hadfield demonstrates in the above video. Urine, sweat, and tears are all collected and filtered back into the station as purified drinking and washing water. In fact, Hadfield claims 93% of all water expelled into the ISS is reused, which is pretty astounding. It’s been even better in the last few years, once the space station was equipped with its own water filtration system for real-time filtering, rather than having to ship giant bags of water back and forth back to Earth. It allows for 6,000 extra liters of water in the station each year.

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Wringing Out A Washcloth Is More Fun On The ISS

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It’s one of life’s great truths that pretty much any activity you can think of automatically becomes more awesome when you tack “in outer space” onto the end of it. Going out for a walk…in outer space. Getting a haircut…in outer space. Filing your taxes…in outer space. On a less theoretical note, we have the video above, which addresses the question, “What happens when you wring out a soaking-wet washcloth…in outer space?”

Once again, our guide through this bit of science badassery is Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield, who spends his off-the-clock time up on the International Space Station answering viewer-submitted questions about crazy space stuff such as the above. In the past, he’s demonstrated how astronauts wash their hands, what happens if they cry, and even how to make a tasty serving of space nachos. We kind of love the guy, and we’ll be sad when he finally joins us back down here at the bottom of the gravity well.