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Book Review: Alien: Sea Of Sorrows Makes Some Questionable Connections

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Sea of SorrowsFor fans of the world Ridley Scott created in 1979 with Alien, Prometheus left many wanting (I still think it was pretty sweet, flawed certainly, but better than many give it credit for), and Prometheus 2, however that works out, is still a ways off. Later this year we’ll get the video game Alien: Isolation, which looks to capture the tense, claustrophobic, isolated feel of the film, but those among us who aren’t into such distractions are our of luck. While it doesn’t fill this void exactly, James A. Moore’s new official tie-in novel Alien: Sea of Sorrows does a solid job of delivering the thrills you crave.

More than anything, Sea of Sorrows aims to reveal some of the secrets and background information about the Alien universe. This includes the ubiquitous Weyland-Yutani Corporation, who is more concerned with profits and their public image than any kind of safety or morality. And it also digs into sinister Xenomorphs as well, delivering new details about them as well. This is a double-edged sword, and provides some cool additions to the canon, but on the other side, there a stretches in the logic and connections the narrative seeks to draw that can be difficult to look past.

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Alien: Isolation Improvises A Cinematic New CGI Trailer

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Some of you may still be looking for a way to forget Prometheus, Ridley Scott’s latest foray into the universe he created in 1979 with Alien, and wash away that experience. (It’s a deeply flawed movie, to be sure, but I still kind of dig it.) If that’s the case, and you’re into video games, we might have just the thing for you. We’ve been talking about Alien: Isolation for a while now, and with the game dropping on October 7, the promotion for Creative Assembly’s newest offering has been coming in a steady stream. The latest piece is this intense trailer, titled “Improvise.”

In this footage, which a little tag informs you is not actual gameplay, the idea of improvisation references the character’s action, using parts from a toy to fix an alien detection device. In a larger sense, it has to do with how the game is set up. The creative team went to great lengths to make sure that the way you play the game is never the same twice. Creatures and items aren’t in the same place every time, and they wanted to give it a real world feel by adding these elements and this sense of improvisational fluidity.

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Check Out This Classic Press Video For James Cameron’s Aliens

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Being the 35th anniversary of Ridley Scott’s horror sci-fi classic Alien it’s easy to overlook that James Cameron’s follow up, 1986’s Aliens is also a badass piece of sci-fi cinema in its own right. If you need a reminder of that fact—you probably don’t need anyone to remind you about how awesome this movie is—just check out this vintage behind the scenes look at the film from the original release.

Aliens picks up 50 years after the events of the original. Heroine Ellen Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) has been asleep the entire time, haunted by dreams of what happened on the Nostromo, which, we all know, would be more than enough to traumatize every last one of us. When she wakes up, she finds herself in another kind of nightmare, one where no one believes her and acts like she’s crazy. There can’t possibly be an unholy army of armor plated alien killing machines with acid for blood lurking out there in space, can there?

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Sigourney Weaver And The Original Cast Of Alien Talk Alien: Isolation

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Every few years a video game comes along that makes me wish I played video games. Red Dead: Redemption is like they went into my brain and pulled a sprawling western narrative directly out of my skull. But I played it for like five minutes before I handed the controller over to a friend. Alien: Isolation is the latest addition to this pantheon. Again, it’s like they made a game specifically with me in mind, and while I know that I’m not going to play it, I very much appreciate that it exists. And the fact that the original cast from Ridley Scott’s 1979 Alien got back together for some additional DLC missions only makes it that much more awesome. Check out this video of Ellen Ripley herself, Sigourney Weaver, and her shipmates on the Nostromo talking about their role in the game.

Set between Alien and James Cameron’s 1986 sequel Aliens, Isolation puts you in the point of view of Amanda Ripley, Ellen’s daughter who is first mentioned in the Aliens director’s cut. It’s 15 years after her mother’s disappearance, and Amanda works for the ubiquitous Weyland-Yutani Corporation. When they come across the flight recorder for the ill-fated Nostromo, her search for mommy dearest takes her to the planet Sevastopol, where she finds more than she’s looking for. And by that I mean aliens, nasty, acid-blooded aliens.

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Zoe Saldana As Ripley And Katee Sackhoff As Han Solo In Comic-Con Cosplay Shots

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aliensYesterday, we got to see some truly awesome fan-play as The Hollywood Reporter kicked off one of the sweetest photo projects imaginable, reimagining some of sci-fi’s greatest characters with some of sci-fi’s most popular actors. Firefly‘s Nathan Fillion took on the role of Captain Kirk and Nerdist’s Chris Hardwick checked the time as Marty McFly. And now you can see Avatar‘s Zoe Saldana playing this genre’s most ass-kicking hero, Ellen Ripley, from James Cameron’s Aliens, among others.

Saldana gives a great interview with THR, talking about all three of her simultaneous sci-fi franchises. (She’s also in Guardians of the Galaxy and Star Trek, of course.) As such, it’s no surprise that she should earn the spot of one of cinema’s most iconic female characters, in the movie where she turns from heroine to warrior.

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Fox Unveils Comic-Con Blu-Rays For Alien, RoboCop, Young Frankenstein, And The Fly

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ComicCon2014_Alien_BDOne of the best parts of Comic-Con is all the crazy exclusives that populate the dealer’s room floor, from action figures to posters to shirts and pretty much everything in between. Well, for any Blu-ray aficionados currently hunkering down in San Diego, you might want to swing by the 20th Century Fox booth, as they’ve announced a collection of exclusive Comic-Con Blu-ray editions of four movie classics any GFR reader should own: Alien, the original RoboCop, Mel Brooks’ Young Frankenstein, and the 1958 version of The Fly. The matching artwork should look pretty damn striking all in a row, so you might want to shelve these cover out.

Of course, these are all movies that have been released many, many times over the years, and if you’re a true Alien die-hard, chances are you already own the stellar Alien Anthology. But in addition to the snazzy cover art, each of these three Blu-ray sets is from a limited run of 500, and each comes with a matching numbered lithograph. Here’s what you’ll get on the Alien disc as far as bonus features: