Comic-Con 2014: Fourteen Panels You Don’t Want To Miss On Friday

By David Wharton | 5 years ago

IZomiZombie Pilot Screening and Q&A (11:30am – 12:30pm, Room 6BCF)
If you’re not going to be in town in time for the Wednesday night preview screening, here’s a second chance to see the iZombie pilot, based on the Vertigo comic series by Chris Roberson and Michael Allred. Set to premiere midseason, iZombie is the story of Olivia “Liv” Moore, a 25-year-old medical resident who finds her life plans altered by a pesky transformation into a brain-craving member of the undead. She’s able to disguise her nature so long as she keeps chowing down on a steady diet of gray matter, so working in a field with access to dead bodies comes in handy. One catch: the brains she eats also impart her with visions of the meal’s memories, so she winds up trying to solve murders on behalf of the people she has for dinner. Veronica Mars creator/iZombie showrunner Rob Thomas will be participating in the Q&A, as well as actors Rose McIver, Malcolm Goodwin, Rahul Kohli, and Robert Buckley, and executive producer Diane Ruggiero-Wright (also a Veronica Mars vet).

Falling Skies: Season 4 Panel (4:30pm – 5:30pm, Room 6BCF)
TNT’s alien invasion drama just keeps on trucking, and if you’re a Falling Skies fan who’s still sticking with the show (unlike me), the panel will have unspecified “stars and producers” on hand, as well as exclusive new footage from the current season.

The Art of Babylon 5 (12:00pm – 1:00pm, Room 23ABC)
It’s genuinely surprising — in a good way — to see multiple panels focused on Babylon 5, a sci-fi classic that’s dwindling into obscurity because Warner Bros. refuses to pull their head out of their ass and put it up on Netflix where new people can discover the show. But that’s a rant for another day (every other day), so in the meantime B5 fans can hit up this panel featuring B5 production designer John Iacovelli, art director Mark-Louis Walters, art director Roland Rosenkranz, graphic artist Alan Kobayashi, and concept artist and set designer Timothy Earls, all on hand to discuss “how they were able to design 110 episodes over five years and six TV movies while keeping the sets fresh, exciting and, well, out of this world.”

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