Search results for: elon musk mars

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Is Going To Mars A NASA Pipe Dream?

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MarsBoth NASA and President Obama—at least, early on, before budget realities called for revisions—have outlined goals to get humans to the Red Planet by 2030. Whether or not that’s actually going to happen is up for debate. According to the National Research Council, the space agency’s current plan won’t get us there, and to continue to pursue this course “is to invite failure, disillusionment, and the loss of the longstanding international perception that human spaceflight is something the United States does best.” In other words, NASA just got busted.

Congress authorized the report, which took the NRC 18 months and cost more than $3 million dollars. One of the findings is that on its current trajectory, NASA sorely lacks the funding to make a manned Mars mission happen, even if Obama’s vision pans out. Hmm…where have we heard that before?

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Space Entrepreneur Predicts A Permanent Mars Colony Within Sixty Years

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There have been some exciting landmarks in space exploration in the past year or so. Private corporations like SpaceX have proven that they’re dead serious about their commitment to pushing space exploration forward in a way many of the major governments haven’t tried in a long time. We’ve had headlines that a few years ago would have read like outright science fiction, from a reality show that wants to give people a one-way trip to Mars, to a plan to mine freakin’ asteroids that includes James Cameron among its supporters. That latter jaw-dropper is under the auspices of the company Planetary Resources, and The Atlantic interviewed PR co-founder Eric Anderson a while back about the coming age of space exploration, expansion, and even colonization.

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SpaceX CEO Has Huge Plans For Mars Colonization

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How much would you be willing to pay to be a colonist on Mars? According to Billionaire Elon Musk, a one-way ticket to the Red Planet should cost around $500,000…and he plans to make it a reality, not just a hypothetical. Considering what the mission entails, this price tag is surprisingly reasonable.

Elon Musk is the CEO of SpaceX, a private space exploration company interested in, amongst other things, expanding the space tourism market. According to Space.com, Musk wants to launch a Mars colony program with no less than 10 Mars, traveling by of a huge, reusable rocket powered by liquid oxygen and methane. It’s an extremely ambitious goal, but Musk believes it can be done.

The SpaceX CEO hopes to send machines along with the colonists to produce fertilizer, methane, and oxygen from Mars’ atmospheric nitrogen and carbon dioxide, and construction materials to build transparent domes on the Red Planet. Once finished, the domes would pressurize and allow the growth Earth crops including corn, wheat, and soy. Musk hopes that once the Mars pioneers are self-sufficient, they would transport more people with fewer supplies and equipment from Earth to Mars.

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SpaceX Head Elon Musk Talks About His Multi-Planetary Goals On The Daily Show

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In the history of the world only four entities have managed to put a rocket into orbit and bring it back to Earth. Those entities are the United States of America, the Soviet Union, China, and Elon Musk.

Elon Musk is the founder of PayPal, the man behind Tesla Motors, and the head of SpaceX. While there are others working on the problem, to date SpaceX is the only privately owned organization to put a rocket into orbit. That’s a big deal, particularly since it’s only the very beginning of Musk’s ambitions.

Musk isn’t just the billionaire funding SpaceX, he’s also the company’s Chief Designer. That means he’s smart, really smart, and like a lot of geniuses he’s not the best public speaker. So when he does talk, it’s worth listening and listening hard. This week he went on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and Stewart did his best to make the man’s genius accessible to the average Joe. I’m not sure if he succeeded, but you should watch anyway. Here’s the full, extended interview in two parts…

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Half A Million Bucks Could Get You Round-Trip To Mars

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With NASA getting its budget slashed and space exploration a low priority for every politician not promising a moon base should they be elected, it’s easy to wonder who, if anyone, will carry the torch into this new century. It may be that other countries surpass us in the field of space exploration. Or it may be that the race for the final frontier will be pushed forward by eccentric rich folks. Such as, for instance, the “rocket entrepreneur” who believes we could make a round-trip voyage to Mars for as little as half a million dollars.

The wide-eyed dreamer in question is PayPal co-founder Elon Musk, the CEO of SpaceX, who has partnered with NASA to help design new vehicles to transport crew and cargo to the international space station. Musk told the BBC that his Mars claims are supported by recent technological breakthroughs that are making the ambitious trip to the red planet more realistic and financially feasible.

We will probably unveil the overall strategy later this year in a little more detail, but I’m quite confident that it could work and that ultimately we could offer a round trip to Mars that the average person could afford — let’s say the average person after they’ve made some savings.

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NASA Prepares For Orion’s First Flight Test, Here’s What You Need To Know

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OrionWhen President Obama officially canceled the Constellation Program, one era of U.S. spaceflight ended and another one began—both Obama and NASA made a case for using private companies for the transport of humans and cargo into space. He also assured citizens that the space agency wasn’t about to retire entirely from the game, and dangled the carrot of Orion—their next manned spacecraft intended to bring humans beyond low-Earth orbit. Orion is “Apollo on steroids,” and NASA is currently preparing for its first test flight.

This test flight would have been a big deal no matter what, but after last week’s catastrophes, the stakes feel higher than ever.