Search results for: orson scott card homophobe

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Ender’s Game Director Gavin Hood Sounds Off On The Sad Irony Of Orson Scott Card’s Anti-Gay Stance

EnderI’ll give them this, the people behind Lionsgate’s upcoming adaptation of Ender’s Game aren’t shying away from the controversy inherent in basing their movie on the work of an author with a well-known anti-gay stance. Then again, they don’t really have much of a choice. No one is going to let this one drop, and now director Gavin Hood (X-Men Origins: Wolverine) addresses these issues in a new interview.

Talking to lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, and transgendered centric magazine The Advocate, Hood calls Card’s oft-stated, rather hateful stand on gay rights, especially gay marriage, “dreadfully ironic.” This is in regards to the themes and subject matter of Orson Scott Card’s novel. He says, “Orson wrote a book about compassion, and empathy, and yet he himself is struggling to see that his position in real life is really at odds with his art.”

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Orson Scott Card Wants People to Shut Up Already About His Bigotry

OrsonEnderI vividly remember finding out that Orson Scott Card was a bigot. It was a dark, dark day. It happened while reading an article in Salon, in which the author, Donna Minkowitz, who “worshiped” Card, got to interview him. Her article begins, “It was the most unpleasant interview I’ve ever done.” Why? Because she happens to be a lesbian. And while she knew about Card’s zealous Mormonism, she “somehow failed to ascertain that Card was a disgustingly outspoken homophobe.” Simply reading an interview in which a sci-fi fan meets her literary hero, and then he tells her, “Gay rights is a collective delusion that’s being attempted,” makes me physically cringe. Minkowitz tries gamely to press on, saying she’s willing to live with the contradiction, but you can feel her deflate as you read.

In that interview, Card said, “I’d really hate it if your piece wound up focusing on the old charge that I’m a homophobe… It’s been circulating on the Internet for a long time. It’s really just one of those annoying things that happens. It’s really ugly!” Well, dude, if you weren’t a rampant homophobe, maybe people would stop talking about it. It’s pretty simple, really.

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Why You Shouldn’t Let Orson Scott Card’s Homophobia Affect Your Enjoyment Of Ender’s Game

Orson Scott Card wrote Ender’s Game in 1985. It is, almost without question, one of the greatest science fiction novels ever written. And he’s been doing everything he can to undermine it ever since.

He’s not doing it on purpose, mind you. But the endless cash-ins on the story in the form of mostly inferior and unnecessary sequels (Ender’s Shadow excepted) haven’t exactly helped cement its legacy. Perhaps even worse than those are the man himself. Card is, to put it bluntly, kind of an asshole.

Even his assholery isn’t, in and of itself, exactly news. A lot of authors are grade-A jerks. Harlan Ellison for instance is one of the all time biggest assholes, but people are still able to acknowledge his genius. What’s really making it tough for people to keep enjoying Card’s brilliant writing is the specific focus for some of his assholery. In short, he’s a homophobe.

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Heinlein’s Classic Stranger In A Stranger Land Revisited And Reviewed

stranger_in_a_strange_landI love Robert Heinlein’s 1961 sci-fi classic Stranger in a Strange Land, but it’s by no means a perfect book, and many people prefer some (if not all) of Heinlein’s other books. While 438 pages isn’t a lot by sci-fi/fantasy standards, it feels like a lot more if the tone, sexism, and other counterculture ideas in the book don’t work for a reader. But for me, the length of the book reveals the depth of Heinlein’s narrative talents.

The premise isn’t really all that science fictional: Valentine Michael Smith was born on Earth but raised on Mars (by Martians), and then returns to Earth as a young adult. Sure, it involves Martians and space travel between planets, but at its heart, the book is an exploration of society. It updates Rudyard Kipling’s question by asking what happens to a man raised on another planet when he makes his way back to Earth?

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