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Cross The Streams With Pacific Rim, Classic Godzilla, Dinosaurs, And More

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It’s been a few weeks since Cross the Streams reared its handsome, chiseled face to the world, but we promise it’s only gotten more attractive. That is, if you find seven noses and LED light sockets for eyes attractive. Luckily, we’ve got content of all kinds here, including monsters, cartoons, and slightly insightful documentative stuff. One could ask for more, but questions like that are total crap.

We’re trying to shape up the feature this week by top-loading it with the newer films and shows, while ending on the more classic (or completely forgettable) material of yesteryear, as well as rounding up releases we’ve talked about before that might have shown up on a different streaming site. Nuff ‘splaining. More streaming.

The More Recent

kaijuPacific Rim (HBOGo)
One of the biggest movies of last summer is now one of the biggest movies on HBOGo. Also one of the most woodenly acted, but we don’t mind when the humans fail so long as the giant freakin’ robots do some major damage. And that they do in Guillermo del Toro’s CGI-laden blockbuster. (Not that its profits were as big as its monsters, but still.) It cancelled the apocalypse with Charlie Hunnam and Idris Elba going into mind-melding mode to power their hilariously named Jaegars into city and water to take on the Kaiju that have risen from beneath the ocean. Yadda, yadda, yadda, oil tanker swung like a baseball bat. Pacific Rim is an ass-stomping good time, though it could have used more Charlie Day and Ron Perlman to break up all the robotic dialogue.

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Movie Review: The Darkest Hour In 3D

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The Darkest Hour is not yet another war movie in which aliens are randomly substituted for humans so they can squeak past the MPAA with a PG-13 rating while still delivering maximum shoot-em-up carnage. That instantly lifts this a notch above every alien invasion movie released in the past two years, outside of Attack the Block. Writer Jon Spaihts’ script goes about this in the right way, by telling a story involving a vicious alien attack that’s completely unique in its execution. The very nature of the aliens of themselves is integral to the plot, and that unique idea is The Darkest Hour’s biggest strength.

The film also deserves credit for being a rare alien attack movie that isn’t set in the now generically overused New York or Los Angeles. It fact, it doesn’t show us what’s happening in the United States at all. Instead the script follows two young American entrepreneurs named Sean (Emile Hirsch) and Ben (Max Minghella) on a business trip to Moscow when the unthinkable happens. Strange lights fall out of the sky and start, quite literally, disintegrating everyone. Contact with these creatures means instant death and they seem bent on wiping out all of humanity by the end of the week. They’re really good at it, in large part because they’re virtually invisible until they attack, and in larger part because no one has a chance to figure out how to fight them before they end up dead.

Sean and Ben survive the initial onslaught by hiding with a Swede named Skyler (Joel Kinnaman) and a pair of fellow tourists named Natalie (Olivia Thirlby) and Anne (Rachael Taylor). Lost and alone in a now empty and very dangerous Moscow they look for a way to survive, or barring that a reason to go on living. In the process they may stumble on a way to fight back, because this is of course an action movie and not an all alien attack redo of The Road.

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Darkest Hour Poster Invites You To Spend The Holidays Running From Aliens

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I want to believe there’s a chance The Darkest Hour will be good, since it’s the only other sci-fi movie left to be released this year. Visually at least, it looks great. For instance here’s the movie’s new holiday-themed poster:

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Darkest Hour Motion Poster Disintigrates A Human

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