1

Watch Inception Explained With Animation And Fart Jokes

fb share tweet share

Christopher Nolan’s Inception is a great movie. It’s big, ambitious, full of stunning visuals and interesting ideas, and action packed to boot. It’s also 148-minutes-long, which is a significant investment time wise, and complex as all hell. However, if you want to relive Inception, but don’t two-and-a-half hours to sit down and watch it, or don’t want to do the mental gymnastics, this TL; DW (Too Long; Didn’t Watch) video from gives you the rundown in short order. There are also fart noises, enjoy.

0

Inception: Watch Someone’s Mom Recount Christopher Nolan’s Mind Bending Thriller

fb share tweet share

Christopher Nolan’s 2010 blockbuster Inception is one of those movies that has a nearly endless supply of interpretations. Watch it one time, it obviously means one thing. Watch it again at a later date, in a new frame of mind, it means something totally different. That’s one of the great things about movies and cinema, it can mean whatever the hell you want it to. But I don’t think there’s ever been a reading of Inception quite like this one, by somebody’s mother. There certainly hasn’t been one that’s this funny.

When it comes to movies, many of us have different takes than other people, especially when it comes to family members. (Occasionally I have to check with my dad just to make sure that we actually watched the same film, sometimes I swear we saw two very different things.) And that certainly appears to be the case with filmmaker Joe Nicolosi and his mother, who is the one recounting the movie that she watched.

2

Alien, Inception, And More Reimagined As Traditional Ottoman Paintings

fb share tweet share

It never fails to amaze me just how many out-of-left-field ways creative fans come up with to remix and riff on their favorite movies. We’ve seen animated gifs designed to look like custom neon art. We’ve seen Lucasfilm and ILM employees take sidewalk art to the next level. And now? Now we can see what classic science fiction films such as Alien, Inception, and A Clockwork Orange would look like if adapted into traditional Ottoman-style paintings. See if you can guess which one this is.

Inception

0

Homemade Inception Trailer Will Make You Dream Of Cardboard And Paper

fb share tweet share

Are you actually sitting down and reading this right now? Or are you only dreaming about dreaming about reading this story? Is Leondardo DiCaprio here, or is it just a guy acting like him? Questions like this come up all the time when homemade versions of the original Inception trailer are afoot. And look, there’s one now.

The crafty squad at CineFix are at it again here, taking Christopher Nolan’s $160 million sci-fi actioner and bringing it down to a “summer camp arts and crafts group meeting” level. Which is far more glorious than my description may have you believe. I can barely draw on paper, much less turn mass amounts of it into anything that resembles a movie set depicting a city block turning over on itself. When people say go big or go home, I’m usually already at home.

1

Transcendence: What To Watch After You Experience The Singularity

fb share tweet share

TranscendenceWally Pfister’s directorial debut Transcendence finally opened in theaters over the weekend. The film has a few interesting moments and concepts, but overall is something of a letdown, failing to deliver on a great deal of potential. Flat, dull, and stiff, only touching on the inherent issues in the most superficial way, the film borrows heavily from generations of movies that have come before. Damn near every scene makes you remark to yourself that it reminds you of this or that scene from one movie or another, so we put together a list of titles to watch once you’ve sat through the singularity.

WARNING: If you’re reading this, we assume that you’ve actually watched the movie, and as a result, spoilers are about to start flying willy-nilly.

If, for some reason, you haven’t seen the movie, here’s a crash course. Transcendence is the story of Dr. Will Caster (Johnny Depp). On the verge of making a huge leap forward in artificial intelligence, a radical anti-technology group gives him radiation poisoning. As his body deteriorates, his research partners—his wife Evelyn (Rebecca Hall) and BFF Max (Paul Bettany)—rashly attempt to upload his consciousness into a supercomputer. The results are not good, and Will’s mind, now free from his mortal body, grows exponentially, taking over, pushing technology ever forward, playing with nanobots, and generally getting up to no good.

Pages [ 1 2 3 4 5 ]
2

Close But No Cigar: Science Fiction’s Best Picture Nominations — And Losses

fb share tweet share

ClockworkA Clockwork Orange (1971)
In 1971, Stanley Kubrick released his follow up to 2001: A Space Odyssey with the violent, dystopian classic A Clockwork Orange. Adapted from Anthony Burgess’ best-selling novel, Kubrick challenged audiences with notions of redemption, crime, sex, and government control.

Considered one of the auteur’s best films, A Clockwork Orange earned Kubrick his third straight Academy Award nomination for Best Director, and his second for Best Picture (Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb was nominated for the 37th Academy Awards). The film that ended up winning Best Picture during the 44th Academy Awards in 1972 was William Friedkin’s The French Connection, while Friedkin also won for Best Director over the master film director.

Looking back at the films nominated for Best Picture, many argue that A Clockwork Orange was the superior film. Kubrick’s bleak tale pushed audiences to re-consider societal norms and the art of movie-making altogether. Today, A Clockwork Orange would have a slight edge over The French Connection, just in terms of popularity and legacy.

A Clockwork Orange was also nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Film Editing, but lost out to The French Connection in both categories. Stanley Kubrick never won an Academy Award for Best Director, but he was later nominated for his 1975 film Barry Lyndon and, arguably, A Clockwork Orange was his best chance at a Best Picture and Best Director Oscar. As it stands, Stanley Kubrick only earned one Academy Award in his lifetime: Best Visual Effects for 2001: A Space Odyssey. – Rudie

Pages [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ]
Page 1 of 512345