2

Ron Moore Bemoans Sci-Fi’s Devolution Into Pure Popcorn Entertainment

fb share tweet share

MooreThere’s no denying that writer and producer Ronald D. Moore is a science fiction great. His work on Star Trek was important to the franchise, while his Battlestar Galactica reboot is considered some of the best television has to offer genre fans. So when Moore sounds off on the current state of science fiction, you know people are going to listen.

In an interview with Digital Spy, Ron Moore discussed his feelings about contemporary science fiction in movies and television. The 49-year-old geek icon feels that sci-fi today is content with being purely for entertainment purposes and is unwilling, at the moment, to evolve into something more mature and smart. He feels that his Syfy series Helix is trying to break that mold. Moore says:

‘I think science-fiction for the last 15 or 20 years — on television and in movies — has devolved to just popcorn,’ he says, citing Helix as one of the few examples of more ‘adult’ TV sci-fi. ‘To do something in this genre, it had to be just light and fluffy and silly and adventurous.

‘I think that science-fiction can be deeper, it can be meatier, it can be more adult. It can take itself a little more seriously and try to do something different. That’s certainly what we set out to do with Battlestar and I think that Helix is a good venue for that as well.’

2

Helix Post-Game: Is Anything On This Show Supposed To Make Sense Anymore?

fb share tweet share

 helixWe’re five episodes in, and I think it’s safe to stamp Helix as a pretty bad show, though it’s one that remains watchable as popcorn television. As in, I could replace my eyes with popcorn and still get the same amount of enjoyment from this deeply flawed television program. Like many of the god awful movies that Syfy puts out, Helix is filled with thinly designed characters whose only motivations seem to be making the audience laugh at their poor decisions. But unlike a Syfy Original movie, I’m actually invested in the story and the mystery. For every six groans, there is one genuine “Wow” that gets me temporarily excited.

In “The White Room,” where some of last week’s ever-present secrets start to reveal themselves, the siss-bang-boom scene involves Hatake’s Second Banana raising a bunch of preserved human heads from the snowy terrain outside the Biosystems lab. You’d have thought someone could have built another secret room inside the facility, but these heads are apparently super special. The main gloomy looking head they’re after belongs to a Dr. Hvit, whom the devious “Blood In, Blood Out” Major was tasked with retrieving before he’d be allowed to leave the base.

1

Helix Post-Game: Everyone’s A Threat, But No One Wants To Talk About It

fb share tweet share

helixMy apologies to anyone who noticed that I wasn’t able to get to last week’s episode of Helix. I woke up in an unfamiliar place and realized I was on a lower level of my housing compound. It was only after I was able to provide a saliva sample that I was able to get back to my family and computer. What they don’t know is that the test doesn’t work. The test doesn’t work! But I’m back for this week’s episode, “Single Strand.”

I’m going to have to acclimate to the fact that Helix is a series intent on using every played out trick in the book to weave its mysteries. This is a research lab where the only thing most of the main characters do besides battle diseased vectors is talk to each other. With that in mind, CDC hero Alan is the only person who actually talks to people with anything that resembles genuine honesty. But he’s clueless about everything, because nobody else in that damned place will have a straight conversation. Everybody is hiding something. That makes for frustrating viewing, knowing that a five-minute conversation could fix 75% of the side drama and allow everyone to work together to either find a cure or get the hell out of there.

0

Helix Serves Up More Secrets And Paranoia: Today In Science & Science Fiction

fb share tweet share

HelixStrandFriday night is often a dead zone when it comes to finding good TV, but thankfully Ron Moore’s Helix has given our DVRs something productive to do with the first night of the weekend. The fourth episode of the show’s initial 13 episode run premieres tonight on Syfy, and you can bet things are only going to get worse up there in the Arctic. Never mess around with creepy black fluids, man. Mulder and Scully could have told you that.

Tonight’s episode is called “Single Strand,” and the synopsis is unsurprisingly vague:

Alan and the team deal with secrets and suspicion as the crisis heightens and deadly consequences follow. Meanwhile, Walker tries to survive on Level R.

0

Jeri Ryan Looks Smarmy In Helix’s First Season Teaser Trailer

fb share tweet share


Last Friday, Syfy premiered the outbreak thriller Helix in a double-dose of black blood and genetically modified monkeys. In some ways, it was the best original output Syfy has given audiences in years, and in other ways it was par for the over-the-top course. (Read my lovingly detailed thoughts about the premiere here.) Given a lot of the footage seen in the series’ marketing campaign came from these first episodes, Syfy has now put out a “Super Trailer” featuring events from the rest of this first season. And in it we get a good look at Star Trek Jeri Ryan, star of Voyager, who plays a woman named Constance Sutton.

2

Helix Post-Game: The Tense Mystery Outweighs Frequent Stereotypes

fb share tweet share

helixWhen Syfy debuts a series (and to a lesser extent, one of its movies), you can usually bank on there a lofty concept that will ultimately get blown apart without any subtlety. The two-part premiere of Ron Moore’s contagion thriller Helix did not buck that trend in the least, filling 90-minutes with damn near every sci-fi trope you can imagine in a series that isn’t just called Science Fiction TV Show. Derivative though it may be, Helix manages to contain just enough intriguing moments to make up for the stilted dialogue and lazy writing.

Instead of just rattling off each and every thing that happened in the two episodes, I’d rather just talk about the things that worked and the things that didn’t. No one here at GFR expected Helix to revolutionize the genre, but there was at least one bit that I can safely say blew my mind more than nearly anything else on TV in the last year or so. In keeping with that optimism, let’s start off with the good stuff. Oh, and be warned about SPOILERS. I won’t spell everything out, but I may ruin a surprise or two along the way.