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Explore H.R. Giger’s Twisted World In This Trailer For The Documentary Dark Star

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Swiss surrealist H.R. Giger is best known to the majority of us for creating one of the most harrowing, terrifying movie monsters of all time, the xenomorphs from Ridley Scott’s 1979 sci-fi horror classic Alien. Sadly, he passed away earlier this year, back in May, but a new documentary seeks to examine his life and work, which is every bit as strange and interesting as you might expect. The first trailer for Dark Star: H.R. Giger’s World has arrived, and you can check it out for yourself here.

Directed by Belinda Sallin, Dark World looks at the man behind the macabre, sexually charged artwork. The film peeks into the self-contained world he lived in, where he placed himself at the center, leaving everyone and everything else to revolve around him, which is where the Dark Star portion of the title originates. Only a few of his closest friends and underlings were allowed into this shadowy world he created for himself, and even then it wasn’t easy to navigate, but whereas he was once considered fringe, he has become recognized for his genius and contribution to the art world.

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H.R. Giger’s Unearthed Alien Concept Art Is As Haunting As It Was 35 Years Ago

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AlienOne of our all time favorite movies is celebrating a powerful milestone this year, as Ridley Scott’s classic sci-fi/horror hybrid Alien turns 35-years-old. Watching the film today it is every bit as powerful as the first time you saw it, and it has aged better than perhaps any genre movie ever made. It’s still terrifying, still wildly original, and even though it’s been ripped off countless times, it’s still as fresh as it was three-and-a-half decades ago. A big part of that is the creature and set design from noted Swiss surrealist H.R. Giger, and a new collection of concept art from the film has found its way out of the shadows and onto the internet for you to check out.

These images will be featured on cards that come along with the new 35th anniversary Blu-ray box set from 20th Century Fox, but you can get a sneak peek at them thanks to Yahoo. These paintings are replicas of the original designs that Giger gave to Scott. You not only see the intricate designs that the artist came up with for the sets, and the horrifying creations that would go on to haunt so many of our nightmares over the years, but the twisted eroticism and sexuality that Giger’s work is notorious for is also prominently displayed in these works.

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H.R. Giger’s Private Polaroids Are Just As Creepy As You Expect

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H.R. GigerH.R. Giger is a weird, creepy dude. You don’t create works of art with titles like “Penis Landscape” without being at least a little bit unusual. But you probably got that from his legendary designs and special effects creations for Ridley Scott’s classic Alien and his larger body of work. One of the modern classics of science fiction and horror, the film wouldn’t have had nearly the same atmospheric impact without Giger’s contributions to both the creatures and sets. While that is what the Swiss surrealist is most widely known for, he had a long, illustrious career before passing away this past May at the age of 74 after a fall.

Giger was a prolific painter and sculptor, but was also something of a photographer as well, documenting much of his life on film, including a newly released collection of personal Polaroid photos. They come from a new book called H.R. Giger: Polaroids, and run the gamut from behind the scenes views of his works, to pictures of his pieces in progress, to manipulated self-portraits, and they all fall on the strange side of things. These pictures offer up a unique glimpse into the dark, bizarre world of Giger’s work and mind, and it is just a odd and outlandish as you would expect.

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H.R. Giger, Father Of Alien’s Xenomorph, Has Died At 74

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Giger1Very sad news to report today: Swiss surrealist artist H.R. Giger, best known for designing the iconic, unforgettable xenomorphs from the Alien franchise, has died from injuries sustained from taking a fall down some stairs. Honestly, that sounds like the setup to a bad joke, but it’s all too true, a tragic end for a massively talented man who helped shape the landscape of big-screen science fiction. Sandra Mivelaz, administrator of the H.R. Giger museum in Switzerland, announced that Giger died in a hospital yesterday, May 12, 2014. He was 74.

Giger’s work blended biological and mechanical imagery to create disturbing, fetishistic nightmare visuals that made him perfectly suited to the task of designing one of the most terrifying creatures ever to emerge from science fiction. His work on Alien earned him an Academy Award for Best Achievement for Visual Effects in 1979 (shared with Carlo Rambaldi, Brian Johnson, Nick Allder, and Dennis Ayling). His style and creations have been referenced, riffed on, and outright ripped off countless times in the decades since Ridley Scott’s classic film laid eggs our collective pop culture consciousness.

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Jodorowsky’s Dune Concept Art Includes Brilliant Work By H.R. Giger And Chris Foss

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JodoMoebiusDirector Alejandro Jodorowsky’s legendary attempt to bring Frank Herbert’s Dune to the big screen is one of the great coulda-been stories of science fiction film history. The Chilean-French director spent several years in the 1970s attempting to mount an epic worthy of the Dune name, and one that would have made David Lynch’s eventual version look positively pedestrian. Surrealist artist Salvador Dali would have played Emperor Shaddam Corrino IV, and Orson freakin’ Welles as Baron Harkonnen, a role he was, er, physically well suited to play late in his life. Behind the scenes the talents enlisted were just as impressive: H.R. Giger, French artist Jean “Moebius” Giraud (seen above, right, with Jodorowsky on the left and some sort of S&M superhero in the middle), and iconic British sci-fi cover artist Chris Foss were all going to be on the team, with Pink Floyd providing the music. We may not have gotten to see Jodorowsky’s completed vision, but we are getting an acclaimed documentary exploring it, and in the mean time we’ll have to make do with this amazing concept art from the ill-fated project.

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H.R. Giger Turns 74, Presumably Inside A Bio-Mechanical Hellscape: Today In Science Fiction

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XenoToday the man who helped birth one of the most terrifying creatures in film history celebrates another birthday. H.R. Giger was a key player in Ridley Scott’s original Alien film, creating the design for the various stages of the xenomorph itself, the torus-shaped derelict ship that housed the deadly alien cargo, and the iconic “space jockey,” eventually explored in greater detail and redubbed an “Engineer” in Scott’s 2012 followup, Prometheus. Had it not been for Giger’s involvement, I have no doubt Scott and company would have come up with a suitably creepy creature, but I can’t help but wonder if the Alien franchise would have had as much staying power over the decades if not for the sleek, pseudo-sexual nightmares that clawed up out of Giger’s howling subconscious and burst forth in the film. As Alien producer Gordon Carroll put it, “The first second that Ridley saw Giger’s work, he knew that the biggest single design problem, maybe the biggest problem in the film, had been solved.”

GFR raises a glass full of unidentifiable, unquestionably biological liquid and toasts Giger’s continued health. May he have many more years to birth horrors, and when death does come for him, here’s hoping he reincarnates as a chestbuster that the rips out of the Grim Reaper’s stomach and skitters off to make the world a more unsettling place.

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