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Now You Can Own One Of Those Unearthed E.T. Games For Yourself, Here’s How

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Atari E.T.Do you feel like paying a lot of money for a piece of trash that has been buried for decades and only recently unearthed? Did I mention that it’s a piece of historical trash, sort of, depending on your perspective and what you consider important. There’s been a great deal of talk lately about the E.T. Atari cartridges that were thrown in a hole in New Mexico 30 years ago and that were dug up recently. Now, if you’re in the market for such a trinket, you can buy one to call your very own. It probably won’t work, even if you do have the appropriate console, if that’s what you’re looking for, but by all accounts, this is the worst videogame ever made, so you’re probably not missing out on much.

The Tularosa Basin Historical Society in Alamagordo, New Mexico, which organized the dig and owns all of the unearthed cartridges, recently put 99 of them up for auction on eBay. Some of these, which all come with a certificate of authenticity, lest someone pay lots of money for actual garbage, have already reached upwards of $500, which sounds like a lot for a terrible game that you can’t play.

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Atari: Game Over Trailer Digs Up The Sordid History Of The E.T. Video Game

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Who knew that either a failed video game or digging through a massive pile of trash would be interesting enough to make a movie about? Let alone a movie that looks like something you might want to watch. Well, if this new trailer for Atari: Game Over is any indication, director Zak Penn’s (Incident at Loch Ness) has done exactly that.

Back in 1982, Atari was the word as far as video games were concerned. They were the pioneers, the frontrunners, the innovators, the big dogs. But in one fell swoop that all changed, almost taking the entire gaming industry down with it. When Steven Spielberg’s beloved E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial opened it connected with audiences of all ages in a way that not many films do. Atari, the giant of the business, put out a rushed, half-assed adaptation—it took five weeks, which is insane—that is widely regarded as the worst video game every made, and is largely credited for being the reason behind the temporary collapse of the video game manufacturing business in 1983.

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Atari’s Discarded E.T. Games Unearthed In New Mexico Landfill

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AtariOne of the worst video games ever is Atari’s 1983 attempt to cash in on what would go on to become one of the most beloved movies of all time, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. The game is so legendarily bad that all the unsold copies the manufacturer could get their hands on were buried in a landfill in New Mexico. At least that is the urban legend. But you know why this sort of rumor gains so much traction is because on occasion they do turn out to be real, and this just happens to be the case. A team has in fact uncovered a butt-ton of unwanted copies of the game.

After having problems getting approval, a documentary crew who, for some reason, wants to unearth the long-forgotten stockpile, finally got the go ahead to excavate the Almagordo Landfill in Almagordo, New Mexico. The dig was scheduled for yesterday, and now numerous news outlets are reporting that they did in fact find what they were looking for. In this case, their payday is the 14 truckloads of cartridges that were reportedly dumped and left to rot. They also apparently found one stray copy of Centipede, too.

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The E.T. Atari Game Landfill Documentary Wants You To Be A Part Of It

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e.t. atariEverybody loves hearing urban legends — or so I was told by the old man at the campfire — but so many just rehash the same old nonsense. The girl with the tinsel in her hair actually died many years ago, McDonalds makes food out of slime, and that one pop star who had so much sperm inside of her that she passed out on stage. We know these are total bullshit, but we’re not quite sure about the fate of arguably the Worst Video Game Ever, the Atari 2600’s E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, which is said to have been buried in bulk beneath a New Mexico landfill back in 1983. Fuel Entertainment revealed plans last year to create a documentary centered on the game’s mysterious demise, and they recently announced the upcoming filming will be open to the public!

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Microsoft Producing Xbox Documentary About The Infamous E.T. Video Game Landfill

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LandfillIt seems like every channel or media entity on the planet is getting into the original content business these days. Netflix, Hulu Plus, and Amazon Prime have led the charge when it comes to non-traditional media giving the networks some serious competition, and now Microsoft has announced an intriguing upcoming project for their Xbox 360 and Xbox One consoles. They’ll be producing a documentary series which will, among other things, delve into the notorious story about a New Mexico landfill that allegedly contains millions of unsold copies of Atari’s infamously horrible E.T. video game from 1982.

We first reported on planned excavation of the New Mexico landfill back in July. At the time, a Canadian production company called Fuel Industries had received permission from the Alamagordo, New Mexico City Commission to to excavate the landfill to see if they can uncover all those E.T. video cartridges, or possibly confirm that the whole thing is nothing more than an urban legend.

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Five Sci-Fi Movies With Halloween Hearts

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SpiralCinematically speaking, this time of year is ruled by horror films. That’s a no-brainer. It’s fall, the days are shorter, the nights are darker, and then there’s that whole Halloween thing going on. This is the perfect time for the creepys and crawlys and mass murderys to figure into your movie-watching regime. Horror and science fiction, however, have always been close bedfellows. Not only are they largely relegated to the periphery, snubbed by academia, and looked down as “genre” (just ask any writer that has spent any time anywhere near a literature department what the smartypants folks think of sci-fi), but thematically and subject wise there has always been shared DNA. Depending on who you ask, Alien is either a perfect sci-fi movie with horror elements, or a perfect horror movie with sci-fi elements.

Going back to Orson Welles’ broadcast of War of the Worlds in 1938, Halloween has been used to mask sci-fi-based incursions into our world. What better chance do aliens, creatures from beyond our solar system, and monsters of all shapes and sizes have to blend into our world and walk around unnoticed, like nothing is out of the ordinary? In that spirit, here is a list of five science fiction movies that, at least in part, use All Hallow’s Eve as a backdrop.

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