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Japanese Posters For Alien, Enemy Mine, And Others Are Bonkers In The Best Way

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I may not be sure of many things in this life, but one thing I am sure of is that the Japanese posters for some of my favorite science fiction films are straight-up bonkers, and in the very best way possible. Sometimes it’s just that the Japanese lettering plastered all over everything is actually perfectly consistent with the universe of the story, as with this Blade Runner poster.

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Dune May Get An Animated Adaptation From This Academy Award Nominee

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DuneThis year we got a glimpse of the adaptation that could have been with the documentary about Jodoroswky’s Dune. While that could have a crazy adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic novel, it never materialized, and we subsequently got two other, with David Lynch’s much maligned 1984 version and SciFi minseries in 2000. But just because there already a couple of versions of Dune floating around out there in the world, doesn’t mean there’s room for one more, and this new idea that’s bouncing around is an interesting one indeed.

Academy Award nominee Ari Folman (Waltz With Bashir) is up to Dune into an animated feature, using Jodorowsky’s plan as a roadmap. Yeah, that sounds like it could be an insane good time to us too. But don’t get too excited right away, this isn’t something that’s likely to happen anytime soon, or even something that is in the works. This is just an idea that’s been proposed.

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Dune Concept Art Explores David Lynch’s Take On Frank Herbert’s SF Classic

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Dune3Most of the Dune talk in 2014 has centered on Jodorowsky’s Dune, the critically acclaimed documentary about Chilean/French filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky’s insanely ambitious, but ultimately unsuccessful, attempts to bring Frank Herbert’s Dune to the big screen in the mid 1970s. With folks like Orson Welles, Salvador Dali, H.R. Giger, Chris Foss, Jean Giraud, and Dan O’Bannon involved, it could have been something epic. But in in the end, it fell apart, which paved the way, eventually, for David Lynch’s controversial Dune adaptation in 1984. And while Lynch’s Dune might not be as interesting as the “what if” tale of Jodorowsky’s Dune, it still featured some gorgeous design work, which is on full display in this collection of concept art.

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Scientists Reveal Their Favorite Works Of Science Fiction

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Here at GFR we cover anything that fits under the umbrella of our twin loves: science and science fiction. And just as the bleeding edge of our scientific understanding is forever pushing the boundaries of our science fiction, SF is itself inspiring fans to take transform their love of starships, robots, and the like into careers in real scientific fields. So what are some of the science fiction movies, shows, and books that real-life scientists love best? The Huffington Post recently asked a handful of scientists precisely that.

PermutationCityDr. Max Tegmark is a cosmologist and physics professor at MIT, and the scientific director of the Foundational Questions Institute, which provides grants to “catalyze, support, and disseminate research on questions at the foundations of physics and cosmology.” Tegmark cites Greg Egan’s 1994 science fiction novel Permutation City as his favorite, explaining that Egan’s “explorations of the ultimate nature of reality blew my mind and inspired my own research.”

Dr. Sean Carroll is a theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology, and the author of books including The Particle at the End of the Universe and From Eternity to Here. He lists another semi-obscure work you might want to add to your Kindle: Robert L. Forward’s Dragon’s Egg. Carroll says, “It’s a story about life on the surface of a neutron star, which would ordinarily be considered completely outlandish. A good reminder that ‘life’ might take on very different forms than we ordinarily imagine. Here’s the Dragon’s Egg synopsis from Amazon:

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Dune Was So Confusing To 1984 Audiences Universal Handed Out Cheat Sheets

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DuneMany, if not most, of you out there have read Frank Herbert’s classic Dune, or are at least familiar with the sprawling universe he created over the course of numerous novels (a mantle his son Brian Herbert has picked up). We’re talking about a big ass book. There’s a lot going on, and there’s a lot left out of David Lynch’s 1984 adaptation, a film that is both revered and reviled in seemingly equal measure (and we’re left to wonder what could have been with legendary maverick filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky’s version that never materialized). Because of the extensive mythology and history that Herbert created, the studio was afraid that audiences wouldn’t understand what the hell was going on, so they created cheat sheets for the movie.

For a crib sheet, this is rather extensive; two sides totally means business. Not to mention there’s a great deal of writing, much of which is very, very small, that Universal wanted to the audience to study in a dark movie theater. That’s especially tough when the background makes it even more difficult to read. This doesn’t sound like it would be all that practical.

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Dune’s 1997 Card Game Was Chock Full Of Gorgeous

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BaronThe legacy of Frank Herbert’s Dune has stretched across many different media and iterations over the nearly 50 years since the novel’s original publication. David Lynch’s film version is divisive at best, the Sci-Fi Channel’s miniseries adaptations were well done but remain obscure, and the road not traveled of director Alejandro Jodorowsky’s aborted film version has become the subject of an acclaimed documentary. But one incarnation that might never have hit your radar was a collectible card game put out during the mid ’90s. And it’s a collection worth revisiting, because the games artwork was flat-out beautiful.

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