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Blade Runner And Alien Get The Pulp Fiction Treatment

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It seems like the novelization of films is a dead, or at least dying art. Back in the day supermarket shelves were crammed with hastily written, mass-produced paperbacks based on almost every successful film. (I once read the novelization of Ladyhawke for some reason.)

While novelization has fallen out of favor, you can still find plenty of books that have been adapted into movies where the movie posters serve as covers. But those don’t have any style. They’re just generic marketing. Tim Anderson, a Salt Lake City concept designer for Electronic Arts, has rendered a few of his favorite sci-fi films as old school pulp novels. One for the Wachowski’s The Matrix appeared a while back, but two more have popped up.

There’s one for Blade Runner

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Watch Blade Runner Rendered Entirely In Watercolors

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It’s good to live in a world where people have a lot of time on their hands. Why? Because that means that artists like Sweden’s Anders Ramsell have time to do things like animate the opening sequence of Ridley Scott’s science fiction classic Blade Runner entirely in watercolors.

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These Fake Blade Runner Magazines Might Be Worth A Subscription

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One of the reasons Blade Runner has been such an influential film over the decades since its release is owing to the rich, incredibly detailed world that it presented. The dystopian streets of 2019 Los Angeles feel grimy, crowded, and above all, real. There are some details, however, that even the most eagle-eyed probably didn’t notice, such as the magazines that fill a street-side newsstand. Designed by Tom Southwell of Blade Runner‘s art department, the titles include such intriguing titles as “Kill,” “Zorg,” and “Horn,” which promises a “Cosmic Orgasm.”

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1982 Blade Runner Convention Reel Is A Fascinating Relic With An Awful Soundtrack

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Ridley Scott’s return to science fiction with Prometheus has been met with mixed reviews, but some of the negativity can almost certainly be attributed to the fact that his previous SF outings are to this day two of the most influential films of the genre. With Alien and Blade Runner, Scott created two of the best SF films of all time, despite Blade Runner not finding much box-office success in its original release. If only people had a better idea what they were in for when they bought a ticket…

That’s where this intriguing little pop-culture relic comes in. Below is a 16mm featurette created to be shown at various conventions around the country in the months leading up to Blade Runner‘s June 25, 1982 release date. It features interviews with Ridley Scott, Syd Mead, and special photographic effects supervisor Douglas Trumbull talking about the making of the film, and opens with an atrocious disco soundtrack that single-handedly answers the question, “How do you make Blade Runner look uncool?”

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Ridley Scott Reveals A Scene From Blade Runner 2

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With the release of Prometheus nearly upon us, Ridley Scott is seemingly everywhere, talking up a storm. While the subject is primarily the film about to drop, his return to the halls of science fiction, there’s also been a great deal of discussion about revisiting another of his beloved classics, in the form of a Blade Runner sequel. We’ve all been thinking—and drooling—about this, and obviously so has Scott. In a recent interview he mapped out a potential scene from a theoretical new Blade Runner movie.

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Ridley Scott Wants Harrison Ford In Blade Runner 2 In Some Capacity

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Amidst the massive PR push for Prometheus, a campaign almost as epic as the film itself, bits of news about Ridley Scott’s possible Blade Runner sequel continue to float to the surface. From what we’ve heard so far, Scott’s return to another of his most beloved sci-fi universes will be a sequel not a prequel—set years after the events of Blade Runner—that original screenwriter Hampton Fancher is in talks to tackle the script, and the film will likely feature a female protagonist.

Harrison Ford, who played replicant hunter Rick Deckard in Blade Runner, will not be the protagonist of the sequel, but in an interview with The Independent Scott briefly quipped that he might like to get Ford into the mix. He said, “I don’t think it’ll be Harry [starring]. But I’ve got to have him in it somewhere. That’d be amusing.”

Amusing is not exactly how I would have put it, but can’t you just hear the cheers in the theater at a midnight screening of Blade Runner 2 as Harrison Ford pops up for a quick line or two. Maybe Scott doesn’t even envision Ford as Deckard, maybe he’ll toss him in as a supply clerk or grizzled bartender. At this point everything is so up in the air that it’s all wild conjecture, but what the hell, conjecture is fun, and a Blade Runner movie won’t feel like a Blade Runner movie without a few frames of Ford.