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Faux-fanity: Ranking Science Fiction Swearing From Shuck To Shazbot

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ParentalThe Maze Runner hit theaters this past week, and it turned out to be the rare YA adaptation that actually held our interest. But when we tried to come up with some clever feature to tie in with its release, we drew a blank. The more we thought about it, the more frustrated we became, and the more frustrated we became, the closer we inched to just throwing up our hands and exclaiming, “$#@%!”

Say, wait a minute…

See, The Maze Runner follows in a fine, upstanding tradition of many a creative universe to come before: making its own profanity. Because while science fiction teaches us that there may be no limits to how wondrous or strange our future may be, George Carlin teaches us that there are some things you just can’t say on television, or in polite company. Sci-fi creators have been skirting this issue for decades by conjuring up their own off-color vocabularies for the worlds of their imagination. Here at GFR, we think Deadwood is about as quotable as it gets, so in a spirit of shucking solidarity, we decided to embrace our inner ten-year-olds and look back at some of our favorite sci-fi swear words. First up, the movie that inspired the whole frelling article…

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Comments

  1. Judge Fargo says:

    Sadly you left out “drokk, grud, and stomm” from Judge Dredd

  2. Crumpy says:

    I recall listening to a radio interview with either Rob Grant or Doug Naylor. In it the stated that Smeg was a shorted version of Smegma, which is a cheesy like substance that collects inside the genitals…. Just thought I’d share..

  3. darqmann says:

    Smeg is smegma abbreviated, and Twonk is a legitimate British insult.

  4. Dustin says:

    The original Battlestar Galactica also had the words “felgercarb” and “Gol-mogging.” Felgercarb was used for sh*t, as in “pile of felgercarb,” and Admiral Cain kept referring to the “Gol-mogging Cylons.”

  5. Randomer2112 . says:

    Admittedly from fantasy and not sci-fi, The Magazine Book of the Fallen is full of creative curses, my personal favourite “Hoods stoney (or hairy)balls on an anvil.” Hood being the God of Death