Search results for: crowdfunding

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Stunning Teaser For Sci-Fi Short Sundays

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Back in 2012, filmmaker Mischa Rozema took to Kickstarter, everyone’s favorite crowdfunding source, in order to drum up the funds for a short science fiction film simply called Sundays. That campaign was a success, and the resulting movie is now nearing completion. If this new brief teaser is any indication, it was time and money very well spent, because the film looks like something we’re definitely interested in seeing sooner rather than later.

Sundays imagines a not-so-distant future, one where artificial computer intelligence has finally caught up with, and overtaken, its human counterpart. The film seeks to capture that specific moment, and the consequences of such a drastic, earth-shaking development. Brian Petsos stars in the lead role, though you don’t get much of an idea what exactly that entails from this trailer, pointed out by Twitch. Perhaps he’s one of countless workers that have been displaced by these new advances in technology, but that is just a supposition at this point.

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This Wall-Climbing Robot Has A Thing For High Art

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vertwalkerWe’re not trying to condone the illegal act of tagging public buildings or anything, but we’re saying if you ever did happen to get into such behavior, you’d have a hard time finding something more handy than Sonice Development’s Vertwalker, a wall-climbing robot programmed to perform the kind of wall art that a man with a just a spray can could only dream of. I do assume underground artist Banksy has Inspector Gadget legs, allowing him to do some of the things he’s done, but he’s like a mythical being at this point. Anybody could potentially own a Vertwalker. Owning a Banksy probably breaks a different sort of law or two.

This electronic artist was created by Berlin designers Julian Adanauer and Christoper Haas, who were inspired by art going vertical, no longer held to a horizontal tether. Essentially, it’s a Roomba equipped with a lip around the bottom of the device that creates a vacuum seal to form, allowing it to travel across walls. What makes it even more successful is the minimal amount of friction that the lip causes.

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Applications For One-Way Mars Mission Are Lower Than Expected, But Hope Is Not Lost

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mars oneIt’s been just over four months since the nonprofit Mars One first opened their mailboxes for applications to the upcoming astronaut-training reality show which will culminate in a four-person team traveling on a one-way, internationally broadcast mission to Mars in 2023. Dutch co-founder Bas Lansdorp had initially hoped for upwards of one million applicants before lowering his goals to around 500,000. But with the August 31 application deadline quickly creeping up, the current total of 165,000 applicants is probably lower than Mars One’s hypothetical worst-case scenario. And it’s pretty surprising, given over 20,000 people signed up in the first few weeks. But Lansdorp is far from discouraged.

“The 165,000 applicants that we have so far is still, a very, very large number,” Lansdorp told SPACE.com, “and the TV people that we talk to — we have two very serious discussions going on with consortia of investors that include media.” Whittling down 24 finalists out of 165,000 people will be quite the undertaking, so I’m sure whoever is going through these entries isn’t upset about a lighter workload. But this wasn’t about people, it was about the application fees that were helping pay for everything from the website to the testing facilities that need to be built to train the adventurous amateur astronauts. This disappointing turnout means $20 million of expected funding never accumulated. Different countries paid different fee amounts, so that number could go higher or lower. Lansdorp wasn’t forthcoming with the specific numbers, but did say the 165,000 included people who hadn’t even paid the fee yet.

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Alan Moore Cares Not For League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen TV Adaptation

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alan mooreIf you’re anything like me, two thoughts rapidly went through your brain when it was announced that Michael Green was writing a TV pilot based on one of comic mastermind Alan Moore’s most intriguing works, the historical mystery mash-up The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: what internationally famed actor is going to be inspired to retire after starring in the pilot, and how big of a shit is Moore going to take on the project?

It turns out there’s no reason to bring out the four-ply toilet paper, as Moore’s response was far more humdrum than rage-addled. Speaking with Entertainment Weekly, Moore talks about a Kickstarter project (which we’ll get to in a bit) more than he does about the League pilot. And why wouldn’t he, since the adaptation-discouraging author clearly won’t have anything to do with it?

When asked if he or co-creator/series artist Kevin O’Neill will be involved at all, Moore surprisingly didn’t rear his head back and shoot flames out of his ears while chortling madly. Instead, he said:

Me and Kevin have been chuckling about that one; we only heard about it the other day. When [DC Comics] did the recent Watchmen prequel comics, I said all sorts of deeply offensive things about the modern entertainment industry clearly having no ideas of its own and having to go through dust bins and spittoons in the dead of night to recycle things.

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Goliath Kickstarter Will Fund A Short Film About A 12-Foot Robotic Prison Guard

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Crowdfunding has been getting a ton of attention in the wake of the massively successful Kickstarter campaign that resurrected the short-lived Veronica Mars as an upcoming feature film. But while high-profile projects like that may get the most headlines, crowdfunding is at its best when it’s helping smaller projects spring to life, projects which might never have made it through the Hollywood grist mill, but which can appeal directly to their potential audience for support. Those aspiring projects run the gamut when it comes to genre, theme, and style, but one way to set yourself apart from the pack: include a 12-foot prison robot in your pitch. It certainly got our attention.

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Arrowhead: Signal Sci-Fi Short Film Becoming Australian TV Movie

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Correction: we initially reported that Arrowhead: Signal was going to be an ongoing TV series. It will instead become a TV movie on Australia’s SF network.

Loyal GFR readers may recall last October when we ran a story about Arrowhead: Signal, the above science fiction short film that was aiming to become a full-length feature film. Written and directed by Jesse O’Brien, Arrowhead: Signal is a 10-minute, dialogue-free story about Kye, a mercenary stranded alone on a desert moon. It’s a simple tale that hints at the loneliness and monotony of Kye’s plight, and which features some great visuals and CGI work to render the other planets/moons looming on the horizon.

At the time we covered it, O’Brien was using the Australian crowdfunding service Pozible to try and raise money for a full-length feature version. Now it is indeed making the transition to feature length, set to air on the Australian sci-fi channel SF sometime in 2014. There’s no word when/if Arrowhead might air outside of the Land Down Under, but the CNet Australia story suggests it will later broadcast elsewhere. Given the success of imported shows such as Continuum, it wouldn’t surprise me at all if Arrowhead shows up on Syfy’s schedule here in the States at some point.